Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

Parallels

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Politics & Policy

Japan's draft of a new energy proposal calls for opening nuclear power plants that were shut down after the nuclear disaster in 2011. Greg Webb/IAEA/AP hide caption

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Greg Webb/IAEA/AP

Idle No More: Japan Plans To Restart Closed Nuclear Reactors

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A demonstrator confronts riot policemen during an anti-government protest in Caracas, Venezuela's capital, on Feb. 22. Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Has Little Leverage To Stop Political Violence In Venezuela

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Clashes break out between rival Egyptian groups near Cairo's Tahrir square, on Jan. 25, 2014. The day marked the third anniversary of the uprising that toppled former ruler Hosni Mubarak, but the military is back in control in Egypt. Khaled Kamel/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Kamel/AFP/Getty Images

Activists protest Uganda's anti-gay legislation in Nairobi, Kenya, this month. LGBT status has been grounds for asylum in the U.S. since 1994, but winning refugee status can be difficult, particularly for people who are unable to obtain visas to the U.S. before applying. Dai Kurokawa /EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Dai Kurokawa /EPA/LANDOV

Gays And Lesbians Seeking Asylum In U.S. May Find A Hard Road

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Clara Rojas waves as she arrives at an airport near Caracas, Venezuela, on Jan. 10, 2008, after being released from six years of captivity by Colombian rebels. Gregorio Marrero/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Marrero/AP

The Colombian Politician With An Incredible Back Story

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People pass by a portrait of prominent opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko at Independence Square in Kiev, Ukraine, on Monday. Tymoshenko, a former prime minister, is one of the leaders who have emerged after the ouster of President Viktor Yanukovych, but she is also a controversial figure. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Marko Drobnjakovic/AP

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro raises his fist after the National Assembly gave him wide-ranging powers to rule by decree for one year on Nov. 19, 2013. With the economy struggling, demonstrators have taken to the streets the streets. Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images

Anti-government protesters clash with police on Independence Square in Ukraine's capital Kiev early Wednesday. The protests have been going on for three months, and Tuesday was the deadliest day yet, with at least 25 reported killed. Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images

Norm Eisen, the U.S. ambassador to the Czech Republic, poses at his official residence in Prague in October 2013. Eisen's mother was born and raised in what was Czechoslovakia and was sent by the Nazis to the Auschwitz concentration camp, which she survived. Filip Singer/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Filip Singer/The Washington Post/Getty Images

A North Korean KN-08 intercontinental ballistic missile rolls past in a military parade in Pyongyang in July to mark the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice. A team of U.S. researchers recently found the buildings where the North Korean military is believed to be assembling the launchers. David Guttenfelder/AP hide caption

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David Guttenfelder/AP

Low-income Iranians line up to receive food supplies in south Tehran. Iran remains an economy of subsidies, although some direct cash payments have been replaced by food baskets for the poor. Davoud Ghahrdar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Davoud Ghahrdar/AFP/Getty Images

Iran's Hope Is Sanctions Relief, But Reality Is Struggling Economy

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A visitor to a military exhibition in New Delhi, India, on Feb. 6. Global military spending is expected to increase this year for the first time in five years. The biggest increases are expected in China and Russia. Anindito Mukherjee/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Anindito Mukherjee/Reuters/Landov

Protesters in Brussels, Belgium, march on Feb. 2 against a proposed law that would allow terminally ill kids to choose euthanasia. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

Belgian Proposal: Terminally Ill Kids Could Choose Euthanasia

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