Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

Parallels

Many Stories, One World

Politics & Policy

Aung San Suu Kyi (left) speaks with military generals during the presidential handover ceremony in Naypyitaw, Myanmar on Wednesday. Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, will hold several top positions in the new civilian government, including the post of foreign minister. Nyein Chan Naing/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Nyein Chan Naing/AP

Dirk van der Maelen, a Social Democratic member of Belgium's Federal Parliament, defends the country's motto, seen here: "Unity makes strength." He think Belgium needs to remain unified, now more than ever. But there are also renewed calls for the country to split into two. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Melissa Block/NPR

Belgium Terrorist Attacks Prompt A Renewed Sectarian Debate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472442332/472442333" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Belgian police and soldiers secure the area outside the Zaventem Airport in Brussels on Tuesday. The airport has been closed since the March 22 suicide bombing, and there's still no date for reopening it. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

A Week Later, No Word On When Brussels Will Reopen The Airport

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472296581/472309603" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman places flowers on a coffin during a protest against violence in Rio de Janeiro last October. Brazil's violence is at an all-time high, with nearly 60,000 murders a year. Silvia Izquierdo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Silvia Izquierdo/AP

Brazil Has Nearly 60,000 Murders, And It May Relax Gun Laws

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472157969/472176352" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Radovan Karadzic sits in the courtroom in the Hague during the reading of his verdict at The International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia on Thursday. Robin Van Lonkhuijsen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robin Van Lonkhuijsen/AFP/Getty Images

Two Decades After The War, A Genocide Conviction For Radovan Karadzic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471762393/471762394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo human rights group demand information about missing relatives during their traditional Thursday march in Buenos Aires on March 3. The women began demonstrating in 1977. Victor R. Caivano/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Victor R. Caivano/AP

Despite The Awkward Timing, Argentina Welcomes Obama

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471563694/471622206" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman visits a memorial Nov. 16 near the Bataclan concert hall in Paris. The attack on multiple locations in Paris last fall left 130 dead. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Ramos/Getty Images

A plainclothes police officer kicks a demonstrator as Turkish anti-riot police disperse supporters in front of the headquarters of the Turkish daily Zaman newspaper in Istanbul on March 5. Turkish authorities seized the headquarters in a midnight raid. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Amid Crackdown In Turkey, Dissatisfaction With President Erdogan Grows

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471290845/471316434" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Crew members of the U.S. Navy destroyer USS Jason Dunham load supplies while docked in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in 2015. The U.S. and Cuba have restored diplomatic relations, but the U.S. says it remains committed to keeping the base. David Welna/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
David Welna/NPR

Obama's Cuba Visit Raises The Question Of Guantanamo Bay's Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471233389/471233390" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alejandro Gonzalez Raga and his wife, Bertha Bueno Fuentes, visit the U.N. Council of Human Rights in Geneva in 2013. After Gonzalez was imprisoned in Cuba for five years, the Catholic Church and Spanish government helped negotiate his release, into exile in Spain. His wife and children were allowed to accompany him, and the family currently has refugee status in Spain. Courtesy of Alejandro Gonzalez Raga hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Alejandro Gonzalez Raga

Pressing For Change In Cuba, From Exile In Spain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470831222/471194964" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan talks at a ceremony Friday commemorating the 101st anniversary of the Battle of Gallipoli in Canakkale, Turkey, Friday. Turkey and the European Union annouced an agreement Friday to deal with Syrian refugees. But Turkey-EU relations have been strained on a number of issues. Kayan Ozer/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kayan Ozer/AP

China's U.N. Ambassador Liu Jieyi speaks with U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power before the Security Council vote on sanctions against North Korea on March 2. Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images

Why China Supports New Sanctions Against North Korea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470956712/471008340" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden spoke via video conference at the Johns Hopkins University auditorium in Baltimore Feb. 17. Juliet Linderman /AP hide caption

toggle caption
Juliet Linderman /AP

NSA: Fallout From Snowden Leaks Isn't Over, But Info Is Getting Old

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470579448/470715941" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former Houston Rockets basketball player Yao Ming arrived at China's Great Hall of the People to attend the opening session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing on March 3. Many prominent Chinese figures take part, though delegates lack real power. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andy Wong/AP

China's Legislative Session: Many Stars, But Little Power

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470533082/470567065" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators parade large inflatable dolls, depicting Brazil's former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva in prison garb and current President Dilma Rousseff dressed as a thief, in Sao Paulo on Sunday. The corruption scandal at the state-run oil giant Petrobras has ensnared key figures from Rousseff's Workers' Party, including Silva, her predecessor and mentor. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andre Penner/AP