Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy meets with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Egypt's Relations With U.S.: 'It's Like A Marriage. It's Not A Fling'

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At Harmanli Camp in Bulgaria, hundred of asylum seekers — mostly from Syria and Afghanistan — live in reconfigured shipping containers and decommissioned military schools. The poor country is ill-equipped to deal with the influx of refugees from Syria. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

With Dogs And Batons, Bulgaria Tells Syrian Refugees To Turn Back

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A man walks past a huge election poster in Baghdad promoting Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki (center) and his political allies. Maliki has ruled for eight years and is seeking another four years. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

A worker with Afghanistan's Independent Election Commission unloads ballot boxes in Kabul. Ballots have been coming in from all over the country, but results are not expected to be announced for about two weeks. In addition, there will likely be a runoff election between the top two candidates in June. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

After Voting, Afghans Must Now Wait For A Winner

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A man walks past a billboard for presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani in the Afghan capital Kabul. President Hamid Karzai is stepping down and the country is poised for its first-ever democratic transition of power. The ballot is set for Saturday. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Latvia's former president, Vaira Vike-Freiberga, is shown here at a NATO summit in 2006. During her presidency, Latvia joined both NATO and the European Union in 2004. ROMAN KOKSAROV/AP hide caption

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ROMAN KOKSAROV/AP

Latvia's Ex-President: 'We Have To Worry' About Russia

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Relatives of defendants gather outside the courthouse in the central Egyptian city of Minya on Tuesday. Some 700 Islamists charged with deadly rioting were on trial. The day before, the court sentenced 529 men to death for killing a policeman. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Parts of the fence along the U.S.-Mexico border might stop vehicles, but they don't keep out those making the journey on foot. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Crossing The Desert: Why Brenda Wanted Border Patrol To Find Her

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President Obama and Michelle Obama meet Pope Benedict XVI at the Vatican in 2009. The president will meet Pope Francis at the Vatican on Thursday. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

The Sometimes Tricky Relations Between Popes And Presidents

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Russian lawmaker Leonid Slutsky wears a ribbon to show support for Russia's takeover of Crimea. The same symbol is used to mark the Soviet victory in WWII and dates back centuries. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Afghan Special Forces converge on an Independent Election Commission office after the Taliban launched an assault on the compound Tuesday in Kabul. Two suicide bombers detonated their vests outside the offices while gunmen stormed the building. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

St. Petersburg-based Bank Rossiya is the only Russian institution to be sanctioned by the Obama administration. The measures are beginning to have an effect on the Russian economy. Elena Ignatyeva/AP hide caption

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Elena Ignatyeva/AP