Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

Former Guantanamo prison inmates walk between their tents and the U.S. Embassy in Montevideo, Uruguay's capital, where four former prisoners are protesting what they say is an inadequate deal in exchange for permanent asylum. Pablo Porciuncula/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Porciuncula/AFP/Getty Images

Ex-Gitmo Detainees In Uruguay Protest At U.S. Embassy

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Earlier this month, Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia's new deputy crown prince, met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi in Cairo. Egyptian Presidency Handout/EPA /Landov hide caption

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Egyptian Presidency Handout/EPA /Landov

Saudi King Salman Reshuffles Line Of Succession

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People injured in a devastating earthquake receive treatment at a hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal's capital, on Tuesday. Hungry and desperate villagers rushed toward relief helicopters in remote areas of Nepal, begging to be airlifted to safety. Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images

Wounded Nepalis Stream Into Kathmandu, Overwhelming Hospitals

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An elderly Japanese woman carries water past a home destroyed several days earlier on Jan. 17, 1995, by a powerful earthquake centered in Kobe, Japan. More than 6,000 people were killed and destruction was widespread, but the city was rapidly rebuilt. Lois Bernstein/AP hide caption

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Lois Bernstein/AP

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Boston on Monday. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

The Past Haunts The Present For Japan's Shinzo Abe

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Migrants crowd an inflatable dinghy as members of the Italian coast guard approach them off the Libyan coast in the Mediterranean Sea on April 22. Alessandro Di Meo/AP hide caption

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Alessandro Di Meo/AP

For Europe-Bound Migrants, Desperation Outweighs Risks

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Migrants wait to disembark at the Catania harbor in southern Italy on April 24. In recent weeks, hundreds of migrants leaving Libya have drowned trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea to European countries, including Italy, Spain and Greece. Alessandra Tarantino/AP hide caption

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Alessandra Tarantino/AP

Flood Of Desperate Refugees Tests Spaniards' Tolerance

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Armenians lay flowers Tuesday at the Tsitsernakaberd Armenian Genocide Memorial in Yerevan, Armenia. Armenians on Friday will commemorate 100 years since 1.5 million of their kin were killed by Ottoman forces. Armenians and many historians call it the first genocide of the 20th century, but Turkey fiercely rejects that label. Karen Minasyan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Minasyan/AFP/Getty Images

Turks And Armenians Prepare For Dueling Anniversaries On Friday

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Jewish worshippers gather at a makeshift synagogue established by the Jewish Agency for Israel for Ethiopian Jews in Gondar, Ethiopia, in 2012. Jenny Vaughan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jenny Vaughan/AFP/Getty Images

They Speak Hebrew And Keep Kosher: The Left-Behind Ethiopian Jews

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Relatives of victims of the Sewol ferry accident stand before a banner featuring victim photos during a protest. More than 300 people, most of them high school students, died in the accident. Nine people remain missing. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

A Year After Ferry Disaster, South Koreans Await Answers

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Poland's second-largest city is also a major tourist destination. Krakow (seen here at night from the Krakus Mound) is suffering some of the worst air pollution in Europe. Arek Olek/Flickr hide caption

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Arek Olek/Flickr

Plagued By Smog, Krakow Struggles To Break Its Coal-Burning Habit

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Koreans — many of them elderly — line up to receive 500 won, or about 50 cents, from Shin Banpo Church in southern Seoul. Each week, organizers say, a few hundred seniors show up at each church that offers the service, and the line starts hours in advance. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

A Forgotten Generation: Half Of South Korea's Elderly Live In Poverty

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A woman holds up a blanket with the portrait of Caracas Mayor Antonio Ledezma during a demonstration on Feb. 20 to protest his detention. He was arrested on charges of planning a coup, which he denies. He is one of three opposition mayors who have been jailed; more than 30 face criminal charges. Miguel Gutierrez/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Miguel Gutierrez/EPA/LANDOV

The 33 Venezuelan Mayors Who Face Charges (And Oppose The President)

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President Obama speaks to NPR's Steve Inskeep at the White House on Monday. The president is pressing hard for a full-fledged nuclear agreement with Iran, part of his outreach to states that previous presidents ostracized for decades. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard/NPR

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani, speaking in Tehran in February, has spoken out in favor of nuclear negotiations and opening Iran to the world. But he has faced criticism from hard-liners at home. Ahmad Halabisaz/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Ahmad Halabisaz/Xinhua/Landov