Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

Parallels

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Politics & Policy

A Kenya Wildlife Services ranger stands guard in front illegal stockpiles of burning elephant tusks at the Nairobi National Park on April 30, 2016. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images

Up In Flames: Kenya Burns More Than 100 Tons Of Ivory

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Chinese officials answer questions about a new law regulating overseas nongovernmental organizations during a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday. The new law subjects NGOs to close police supervision. "We welcome and support all foreign NGOs to come to China to conduct friendly exchanges," one official said. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

China Passes Law Putting Foreign NGOs Under Stricter Police Control

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Randy Berry, the first U.S. special envoy for the rights of LGBTI persons, is shown at a gay pride rally in Sao Paulo, Brazil, last June. He says the U.S. is supporting activists worldwide but recognizes the risks they face in many countries. A gay activist who worked at the U.S. Embassy in Bangladesh was hacked to death this week. Courtesy U.S. State Department hide caption

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Courtesy U.S. State Department

For State Department's LGBTI Envoy, Every Country Is A Different Challenge

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Manuel Santos feeds 6-month-old Carmen last July, as biological father Bud Lake looks on. A Thai court ruled Tuesday that Lake has custody of Carmen, now 15 months old. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

An independent paper owned by billionaire Russian businessman and Brooklyn Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov — shown here Jan. 11 in New York — is under fire, but the Kremlin says it's not applying pressure on media. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

For Journalists In Russia, 'No One Really Knows What Is Allowed'

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Syrian Raed Saleh came to Washington to receive an award for his rescue work in his homeland. However, he was turned back at Dulles International Airport outside Washington. No reason was given. In his honor, those attending the Tuesday evening banquet wore white helmets, a symbol of his group, Syria Civil Defense. Courtesy of Relief International hide caption

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Courtesy of Relief International

A Syrian Lands In The U.S. For An Award, Only To Be Turned Back

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U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, shown here at the Pentagon in March, has said the "new breed of warrior" — cyberwarriors — will be expected to fight just as hard as their colleagues on conventional battlefields. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Rules For Cyberwarfare Still Unclear, Even As U.S. Engages In It

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Egyptian human rights activist Hossam Bahgat (center) leaves a Cairo courtroom on Wednesday after a hearing in which the state requested a travel ban and freeze of his assests. The government has taken action against a number of groups and activists in what crictis say is an attempt to suppress opposition. MOHAMED EL-SHAHED/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MOHAMED EL-SHAHED/AFP/Getty Images

A Crackdown In Egypt, Reflecting A Broader Trend In The Region

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Morocco's King Mohammed VI waves during a ceremony at the royal palace in the capital Rabat in 2014. Following the Arab uprisings of 2011, the king introduced limited changes and a new constitution. But critics say freedom of expression and other rights have been curtailed in recent years. Abdeljalil Bounhar/AP hide caption

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Abdeljalil Bounhar/AP

Morocco Boasts Stability, But Critics Say The Price Is High

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The Rock of Gibraltar, and Gibraltar's marina. The British territory at the southern end of Spain was known as a tax haven and hosts an office of Mossack & Fonseca, the law firm at the center of the Panama Papers. However, Gibraltar amended its laws five years ago and sees itself as a low-tax place that's attractive for international business. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

Once A Tax Haven, Gibraltar Now Says It's Low-Tax

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Protesters last month vent their anger over President Dilma Rousseff (left) moving to appoint her predecessor, Luis Inacio Lula da Silva, as her chief of staff — an action that would have shielded him from prosecution. A court blocked him from the post. Rousseff faces the possibility of impeachment while Lula is under investigation for corruption. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

With The Economy Crashing, Brazilians Turn On A Once-Popular President

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Pope Francis welcomes Iranian President Hassan Rouhani at the Vatican on Jan. 26. The pope has been extremely active in global political affairs and has often been critical of the West. Pool/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro attend a baseball game during Obama's visit to Havana on March 22. The U.S. has opened up to a number of longtime foes in recent years, including Cuba. This has raised a debate about whether this leads to improved human rights in these countries. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Members of the Chinese navy stand guard on China's first aircraft carrier, Liaoning, in 2013. Tensions in the South China Sea have grown over territorial disputes between China, the Philippines, Japan, Vietnam and others. Reuters/China Stringer Network/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/China Stringer Network/Landov

Who Owns The South China Sea?

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The Rock of Gibraltar, as seen from the Spanish town of La Linea de la Concepcion, at Spain's southern tip. Gibraltar has been British territory for 301 years, but many Spaniards want it back. Fresh squabbles over fishing rights cropped up recently. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

For Tiny Gibraltar, There's A Lot At Stake In The 'Brexit' Vote

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