Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

Foster worked as a sociology professor at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies in southern China for a total of five years before he was charged with theft and sent to jail. Courtesy of Stuart Foster hide caption

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Courtesy of Stuart Foster

U.S. Teacher: I Did 7 Months Of Forced Labor In A Chinese Jail

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Muslim Rohingya women are pictured at the Thae Chaung camp for internally displaced people in Sittwe, Myanmar, on April 22. The stateless Rohingya in western Myanmar have been confined to the camps since violence erupted with majority Buddhists in 2012. The camps rely on international aid agencies, but still lack adequate food and health care. Minzayar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Minzayar/Reuters/Landov

In Buddhist-Majority Myanmar, Muslim Minority Gets Pushed To The Margins

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Father Ibrahim Shomali, a Palestinian priest, holds prayer vigils every Friday in the Cremisan Valley near Bethlehem. Israel is planning to build a wall, citing security needs, on agricultural land here owned by a local monastery. Shomali has asked Pope Francis to intervene. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Palestinians Appeal To Pope For Help In Land Disputes With Israel

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Thai soldiers move in on a pro-government demonstration on the outskirts of Bangkok on Thursday. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha has announced a military takeover of the government, saying the coup was necessary to restore stability after six months of political turmoil. Wason Wanichakorn/AP hide caption

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Wason Wanichakorn/AP

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki votes in Baghdad on April 30. Maliki's alliance won the most seats in election results announced this week. But his party will still have to build a coalition with rival parties for him to keep the job he's had for the past eight years. AP hide caption

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AP

25 Years On, Mothers Of Tiananmen Square Dead Seek Answers

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Narendra Modi, shown here at an April 5 campaign rally, was ostracized by the United States for more than a decade. As it became increasingly clear in recent months that he was likely to become India's next leader, the U.S. and European countries began reaching out to him. Sam Panthaky /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Panthaky /AFP/Getty Images

Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi is poised to become India's next prime minister after his party's sweeping parliamentary victory on Friday. Ajit Solanki/AP hide caption

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Ajit Solanki/AP

Chinese sailors stand guard on China's first aircraft carrier as it travels toward a military base in Hainan province. China has been waging a public crackdown on military corruption, perhaps the largest such campaign in more than six decades of communist rule. China Stringer Network/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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China Stringer Network/Reuters/Landov

China Puts Brass On Trial In Fight Against Military Corruption

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Uruguay's President Jose Mujica, who is known for his modest lifestyle, sits outside his home on the outskirts of Montevideo earlier this month. Under his leadership, Uruguay legalized marijuana, from the growing to the selling. Matilde Campodonico/AP hide caption

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Matilde Campodonico/AP

Meet Uruguay's Pot-Legalizing, VW-Driving, Sandal-Wearing President

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Rwandan President Paul Kagame takes part in a conference on the role of women at the nation's Parliament in the capital, Kigali, in 2010. Women in Rwanda account for 64 percent of the lower house of Parliament — a higher percentage than in any other country. Jason Straziuso/AP hide caption

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Jason Straziuso/AP

The Nation That Elects The Most Women Is ...

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An activist waves the Ukrainian national flag at Independence Square on April 6. Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters/Landov

In Ukraine's Corridors Of Power, An Effort To Toss Out The Old

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The Rev. Desmond Tutu, shown during a press conference last month in Cape Town, has been sharply critical of South Africa's political leadership as the country marks 20 years since the end of apartheid. He said he wouldn't vote for the ruling African National Congress in Wednesday's election. Jennifer Bruce/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jennifer Bruce/AFP/Getty Images

Iranian lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh (shown here at her home in Tehran on Sept. 18, 2013, following her release from prison) was one of the last lawyers taking on human rights cases in Iran before her arrest in 2010. Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

Iranian Activist Says Her Release Is A Gesture, Not A New Era

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