Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

Parallels

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Politics & Policy

Two men sit inside the chapel at Halden prison in far southeast Norway in this picture taken in 2010. Prisoners here spend 12 hours a day in their cells, compared to many U.S. prisons where inmates spend all but one hour in their cell. STR/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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STR/Reuters/Landov

In Norway, A Prison Built On Second Chances

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Striking French teachers hold a German flag as they take part in a nationwide protest against new measures aimed at revamping the country's school system, in Marseille, France, on May 19. France's 840,000 teachers are largely opposed to the reform, their unions say, fearing it will increase competition between schools and exacerbate inequalities. Jean-Paul Pelissier/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Jean-Paul Pelissier/Reuters/Landov

Does Less Latin Mean Dumbing Down? France Debates School Reform

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Ada Colau (center), leader of the Barcelona en Comú party, celebrates in Barcelona during a press conference following the results in Spain's municipal and regional elections on May 24. She is the first member of Spain's indignados protest movement to win public office. Quique Garcia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Quique Garcia/AFP/Getty Images

From 'Occupying' A Spanish Bank To City Hall: Barcelona's New Mayor

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A fishing boat carrying Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants is pulled to shore by Achenese fishermen off the coast of Julok, in Indonesia's Aceh province, on Wednesday. Antara Foto/Syifa/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Antara Foto/Syifa/Reuters/Landov

Desperate Rohingya Granted Temporary Shelter. But What Next?

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A plane sprays coca fields in San Miguel, Colombia, in 2006. The Colombian government announced this week that it is phasing out the U.S.-backed aerial coca-eradication program over health concerns. William Fernando Martinez/AP hide caption

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William Fernando Martinez/AP

Colombia Will End Coca Crop-Dusting, Citing Health Concerns

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Ayelet Shaked of the right-wing Jewish Home party, shown here on May 6, is Israel's new justice minister. During her two years in parliament, she called for bringing more conservative judges to Israel's highest court. Gali Tibbon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gali Tibbon/AFP/Getty Images

Why Everyone's Talking About Israel's New Justice Minister

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Kurdish rebels in northern Syria walk near the devastated town of Kobani last November. In a global report card on international cooperation, the failure to halt civil wars, like the one in Syria, was cited as the biggest shortcoming. Jake Simkin/AP hide caption

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Jake Simkin/AP

Yae and Ren were married during Tokyo's Rainbow Pride Weekend in April. One Tokyo ward, or neighborhood, has recognized same-sex marriages, becoming the first place in Japan — or anywhere in East Asia — to do so. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

The First Place In East Asia To Welcome Same-Sex Marriage

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Russian military personnel march in Moscow's Red Square during a rehearsal Thursday for the Victory Day military parade that will take place Saturday to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Ivan Sekretarev/AP

At Russia's Huge WWII Remembrance, An Absence Of Western Leaders

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Far more than other Western democracies, Britain concentrates its money, power and culture in the capital, London. Elwin van Eede/Flickr hide caption

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Elwin van Eede/Flickr

London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue

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Much of the Netherlands is below sea level, including Amsterdam. Urgenda argues that any rise in the sea level could have a huge impact on the country. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

A Novel Dutch Lawsuit Demands Government Cut Carbon Emissions

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Former Guantanamo prison inmates walk between their tents and the U.S. Embassy in Montevideo, Uruguay's capital, where four former prisoners are protesting what they say is an inadequate deal in exchange for permanent asylum. Pablo Porciuncula/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Porciuncula/AFP/Getty Images

Ex-Gitmo Detainees In Uruguay Protest At U.S. Embassy

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Earlier this month, Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia's new deputy crown prince, met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi in Cairo. Egyptian Presidency Handout/EPA /Landov hide caption

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Egyptian Presidency Handout/EPA /Landov

Saudi King Salman Reshuffles Line Of Succession

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People injured in a devastating earthquake receive treatment at a hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal's capital, on Tuesday. Hungry and desperate villagers rushed toward relief helicopters in remote areas of Nepal, begging to be airlifted to safety. Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images

Wounded Nepalis Stream Into Kathmandu, Overwhelming Hospitals

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An elderly Japanese woman carries water past a home destroyed several days earlier on Jan. 17, 1995, by a powerful earthquake centered in Kobe, Japan. More than 6,000 people were killed and destruction was widespread, but the city was rapidly rebuilt. Lois Bernstein/AP hide caption

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Lois Bernstein/AP