Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

Dali Shonia (left) and Tariel Kolbaia were among the half-dozen protesters asking for new houses. Kolbaia threatened to light himself on fire if the Ministry of Internally Displaced Persons did not address the protesters' demands. Stephanie Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Stephanie Joyce/NPR

Uprooted By Conflict, Stuck In Limbo, Yearning For A Place To Call Home

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Michael Flynn (with his hand to his ear) sits next to Russian President Vladimir Putin at a dinner in Moscow on Dec. 10, 2015, celebrating the 10th anniversary of RT, an English-language TV channel funded by the Russian government. Mikhail Klimentyev/AP hide caption

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Mikhail Klimentyev/AP

Michael Flynn's Contradictory Line On Russia

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Iranian women cast their ballots for the presidential elections at a polling station at the Lorzadeh mosque in southern Tehran on Friday. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump met with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (left) and Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Sergey Kislyak at the White House on May 10. Russian Foreign Ministry Photo via AP hide caption

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Russian Foreign Ministry Photo via AP

President Trump meets Saudi Arabia's Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office on March 14. Trump is traveling to the kingdom Friday on his first foreign trip. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump's First Foreign Trip Will Include Red-Carpet Welcome In Saudi Arabia

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Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers his speech during the opening ceremony of the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing on May 14. Xi offered tens of billions of dollars for projects that are part of his signature foreign policy initiative linking China to much of Asia, Europe and Africa. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

For China's 'New Silk Road,' Ambitious Goals And More Than A Few Challenges

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In this photo from March 17, released by China Aid, Chen Guiqiu (right) holds a welcome sign with her daughters Xie Yajuan, 15, and Xie Yuchen, 4, after arriving at an airport in Texas. Chen's husband, lawyer Xie Yang, was charged with inciting subversion. Courtesy of ChinaAid hide caption

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Courtesy of ChinaAid

For Family Of Embattled Chinese Lawyer, A Long Road To Safety — With U.S. Help

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Yasunori Kagoike (center) head of an ultra-nationalistic Japanese school operator, walks through the hallway after testifying before an upper house panel at the parliament in Tokyo on March 23. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Land Deal For Right-Wing Elementary School Plagues Japanese Prime Minister

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South African President F.W. de Klerk and Nelson Mandela jointly received the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, Norway, in 1993 for negotiating an end to apartheid. Earlier that year, de Klerk announced that South Africa had dismantled six nuclear weapons, becoming to first country to get rid of nuclear bombs that it had built. Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images

Giving Up Nuclear Weapons: It's Rare, But It's Happened

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French presidential election Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte met and fell in love when she was his high school drama teacher. They married in 2007. Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images

Emmanuel Macron's Unconventional Candidacy Stems From An Unconventional Life

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Protest banners hang in rural Seongju county, where the U.S. has installed a missile defense system known by its acronym, THAAD. Residents oppose the installation, and it's become an issue in South Korea's upcoming presidential election. The front-runner says he wants to rethink the U.S. deal. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Korean Village's Message To THAAD Missile Defense System: 'Go Away'

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A statue of the Greek writer Thucydides sits outside the Austrian capital in Vienna. More than 2,000 years ago, he noted the friction that led to war between an established power, Sparta, and a rising power, Athens. A new book by Harvard professor Graham Allison makes a comparison with the relationship between the U.S. and China. vladacanon/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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vladacanon/Getty Images/iStockphoto

From Ancient Greece, Lessons On The Risk Of A Modern, Accidental War

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A buffalo market in central Rajasthan, India. Drivers ferrying these animals to slaughterhouses have been intercepted and accused of transporting cows, an animal many Hindus consider sacred. A new report from Human Rights Watch says that this devotion to protecting the cow has contributed to recent vigilante violence. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

Lee Seung-won, 74, considers himself a pro-U.S. conservative, and he believes the ousted South Korean president, Park Geun-hye, was unfairly treated. Park goes on trial Tuesday for corruption. An election to replace her will be held May 9. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

In South Korea's Presidential Election, A Referendum On U.S. Relations

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