Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

Parallels

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Politics & Policy

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi waves from a MIG 29 fighter aboard the country's largest warship, INS Vikramaditya, off the coast of Goa, India, on June 14. STR/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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STR/Xinhua /Landov

Nineteen-year-old Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip fired the shots that killed the heir to the Austro-Hungarian empire, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and his wife, Sophie, during a visit to Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. Depending on whom you ask, he's either a hero or a terrorist. Historical Archives Sarajevo/AP hide caption

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Historical Archives Sarajevo/AP

The Shifting Legacy Of The Man Who Shot Franz Ferdinand

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An empty lab used by China Enriching Chemistry, which was accused of shipping illegal drugs to the U.S. Eric Chang, the company's director, is currently in jail in China, where he was charged with producing ecstasy. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

A Chinese Chemical Company And A 'Bath Salts' Epidemic

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A migrant from El Salvador holds a map he received from church workers at the Mexico-Guatemala border. It shows the freight train schedules and routes to the U.S. border. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

A Flood Of Kids, On Their Own, Hope To Hop A Train To A New Life

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President Obama delivers the commencement address to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point on May 28. The president has employed U.S. military force much more sparingly in his second term than his first. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Crimea's new prime minister, Sergei Aksyonov (right), and the speaker of the legislature, Vladimir Konstantinov, attend a rally at Red Square in Moscow on March 18, the day Russia annexed the territory. Russia is pumping billions into Crimea after taking it from Ukraine. However, corruption has been a major problem in Crimea. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Now That Russia Has Crimea, What Is Moscow's Plan?

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Migrants arrive at a rest stop in Ixtepec, Mexico, after a 15-hour ride atop a freight train headed north toward the U.S. border on Aug. 4. Thousands of migrants ride atop the trains, known as La Bestia, or The Beast, during their long and perilous journey through Mexico to the U.S. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Civilians hold rocks as they stand on a government armored vehicle near Chang'an Boulevard in Beijing, early June 4, 1989, before the army began a crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in and around Tiananmen Square. Jeff Widener/AP hide caption

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Jeff Widener/AP

June 4: The Day That Defines, And Still Haunts China

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A Chinese man who became known as "Tank Man" stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing's Changan Avenue just outside Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. It's an iconic image known around the world --€” except in China. Jeff Widener/AP hide caption

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Jeff Widener/AP

For Many Of China's Youth, June 4 May As Well Be Just Another Day

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Foster worked as a sociology professor at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies in southern China for a total of five years before he was charged with theft and sent to jail. Courtesy of Stuart Foster hide caption

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Courtesy of Stuart Foster

U.S. Teacher: I Did 7 Months Of Forced Labor In A Chinese Jail

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Muslim Rohingya women are pictured at the Thae Chaung camp for internally displaced people in Sittwe, Myanmar, on April 22. The stateless Rohingya in western Myanmar have been confined to the camps since violence erupted with majority Buddhists in 2012. The camps rely on international aid agencies, but still lack adequate food and health care. Minzayar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Minzayar/Reuters/Landov

In Buddhist-Majority Myanmar, Muslim Minority Gets Pushed To The Margins

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