Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

Federal agents seized Elián González, held in a closet by Donato Dalrymple, in Miami in April 2000. Dalrymple rescued the boy from the ocean after his mother drowned when they tried to escape Cuba. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se (left) speaks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at their meeting in Tokyo. The two countries are marking the 50th anniversary of establishing relations. While leaders in both countries stressed the importance of the ties, a bitter history continues to strain the relationship. Issei Kato/AP hide caption

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Issei Kato/AP

Best Frenemies: Japan, Korea Mark 50th Anniversary Despite Rivalry

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Serbian protesters hold a banner that reads: "Serbia-Russia, we don't need the European Commission" on March 21 in Belgrade. The marchers were from a Serbian nationalist organization opposed to the government, which has pursued closer ties with Western Europe. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

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Darko Vojinovic/AP

Russia And The West Play Tug Of War; Serbia Feels Caught In The Middle

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The indictment against 24-year-old Palestinian Ayman Mahareeq says comments he posted on Facebook illegally insulted the West Bank police force and the Palestinian Authority, which governs the West Bank. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

In The West Bank, Facebook Posts Can Get You Arrested, Or Worse

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Qatari official Mohammed al-Emadi (left) visits Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh in Gaza City on March 12. Israel has accused Qatar of financing Hamas weaponry but still allows Qatar to spends millions in Gaza on aid and development projects. Ashraf Amra/APA/Landov hide caption

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Ashraf Amra/APA/Landov

Why Israel Lets Qatar Give Millions To Hamas

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Mohammad and Linda Jomaa al-Halabi, along with their five daughters, are among the fewer than 1,000 Syrian refugees who have been resettled in the U.S. They left Syria in August 2012 and arrived last year in Baltimore, where they live now. Michele Kelemen/NPR hide caption

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Michele Kelemen/NPR

Of 4 Million Syrian Refugees, The U.S. Has Taken Fewer Than 1,000

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A medical staff member wearing a protective suit waits to enter an isolation ward for patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, in South Korea. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

MERS Is A Health Crisis With Political And Economic Costs

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Concertgoers take photos of the band Intocable at a concert in Juarez, Mexico last year. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

The Violence Subsides, And Revelers Return To Juarez

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Egyptian security forces take up positions during anti-government demonstrations in Cairo last November. Egyptian activists have been disappearing in growing numbers, and human rights groups say they believe the security forces are responsible. Amr Sayed/APA\Landov hide caption

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Amr Sayed/APA\Landov

As Egyptian Activists Vanish, Suspicion Falls On The Security Forces

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Simon Clements, left, and Steve Williams with their 6-month-old daughter, Sophie, in London. The two British men began the process of finding a surrogate mother more than two years ago. While legal in the U.K., the practice of surrogacy is tightly restricted. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Surrogate Parenting: A Worldwide Industry, Lacking Global Rules

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Family members of Americans held or missing in Iran attend a hearing of the Foreign Affairs Committee on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. From left: Ali Rezaian, brother of Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian; Nagameh Abedini, wife of Saeed Abedini; Sarah Hekmati, sister of Amir Hekmati; and Daniel Levinson, son of Robert Levinson. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Families Appeal To Congress, Call For Release Of Americans Held In Iran

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Visitors check out the Soviet-era metro cars exhibited at the Partizanskaya subway station in Moscow, as part of festivities marking the subway system's 80th anniversary. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Glory Of Moscow's 80-Year-Old Subway Tainted By Stalin Connections

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The Polar Star completes ice drills in the Arctic in July 2013. Built in the 1970s and only meant to last 30 years, the vessel is the U.S. Coast Guard's only heavy icebreaker. U.S. Coast Guard/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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U.S. Coast Guard/Reuters/Landov

As The Arctic Opens Up, The U.S. Is Down To A Single Icebreaker

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Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi speaks at rally in Yangon, Myanmar, last year. Suu Kyi won the Nobel Peace Prize for her struggle for democracy in her homeland, but has faced criticism lately for not speaking out about the plight of the Rohingya, a Muslim minority that has faced discrimination and violence. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

Two men sit inside the chapel at Halden prison in far southeast Norway in this picture taken in 2010. Prisoners here spend 12 hours a day in their cells, compared to many U.S. prisons where inmates spend all but one hour in their cell. STR/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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STR/Reuters/Landov

In Norway, A Prison Built On Second Chances

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