Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

Prime Minister David Cameron's cat, Larry, sits on the steps of No. 10 Downing St. in London on June 24, the day Brexit voting results were announced. If the Cameron family wants to take Larry along on holiday to France, a Brexit could complicate plans. It's possible that traveling to and from the EU with pets will grow more cumbersome. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

The United Kingdom Independence Party's "Breaking Point" EU referendum campaign poster was deemed so offensive and reminiscent of Nazi propaganda that even the official Leave campaign condemned it. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images

The Joint European Torus, a European fusion project in the U.K., gets most of its funding from the EU. Brexit may change that, and the even larger ITER fusion project. EUROfusion hide caption

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EUROfusion

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (left) and FARC commander Timoleon Jimenez (right) shake hands as Raul Castro looks on at a signing ceremony of a cease-fire deal in Havana last Thursday. "It is the first time ever that a guerrilla group lays down its arms to submit to a justice system where they are going to be investigated, judged, and condemned and sanctioned," Santos told NPR. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Desmond Boylan/AP

Colombia's President: Making Peace With Rebels Is 'A Good Investment'

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U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) and Greenland's then-Prime Minister Aleqa Hammond stand on the ice outside the city of Uummannaq, north of the Arctic Circle, in 2014. Greenland held a referendum in 1982 and voted to leave the European Economic Community, the forerunner of the European Union. Greenland's leaders say they believe it was the right decision. Leiff Josefsen/AP hide caption

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Leiff Josefsen/AP

Britain Won't Be The First To Leave A United Europe. Guess Who Was?

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Vyacheslav Trubnikov (right) was head of the Foreign Intelligence Service, Russia's equivalent of the CIA, from 1996 to 2000. He's shown here speaking with U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage in 2001 in Moscow. Trubnikov was Russia's deputy foreign minister at the time. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Russia's Ex-Spy Chief Shares Opinions Of His American Counterparts

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A Japanese mother and her 2-year-old pick up free groceries in Tokyo at the charity Second Harvest. Japan has a limited safety net for the poor and the economy is still struggling to gain traction under Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Halfway Around The World, Brexit Hits Japan's Already Soft Economy

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British Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, the United Kingdom's head financial official, leaves after making a statement at the Treasury in London on Monday. Stefan Rousseau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Rousseau/AFP/Getty Images

What To Know About Brexit Today

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British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (left) and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hold a joint press conference after meeting in London on Monday. The U.S. "could not ask for a better friend and ally," Kerry said. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Boris Johnson, the former mayor of London and a leading proponent for Britain's departure from the EU, holds a press conference in London on Friday. Johnson is considered a leading contender to replace Prime Minister David Cameron, who announced Friday that he will be stepping down by October Stefan Rousseau/AP hide caption

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Stefan Rousseau/AP

European Council President Donald Tusk (center) arrives for a meeting at EU headquarters in Brussels on Friday. Top European Union officials were hunkering down to ascertain next steps after British voters decided to leave the 28-nation bloc. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron, accompanied by his wife, Samantha, speaks to the media in front of 10 Downing St. on Friday as he announces his resignation following Britain's vote to leave the EU. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

People line up outside the Venezuelan National Electoral Council in Caracas, the capital, on Monday. They were confirming their signatures supporting a recall referendum against President Nicolas Maduro. The country is suffering skyrocketing inflation and chronic shortages of basic goods. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP