Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte gives a speech during Eid al-Fitr celebrations marking the end of Ramadan at the Malacanang Palace in Manila on June 27. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. and South Korean soldiers of the combined 2nd Infantry Division train at Camp Red Cloud in Uijeongbu, South Korea, in 2015. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

In Trump Meeting With South Korean Leader, A Chance To Reaffirm 'Ironclad' Ties

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Moon Jae-in, South Korea's president, (center) will meet with President Trump on Thursday and Friday. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

What To Expect From The White House Summit With South Korea's Leader

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Ethel and Julius Rosenberg attend their 1951 trial in New York. They were charged and convicted of giving nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union under the 1917 Espionage Act. The law was intended for spies but has been used by the Obama and Trump administrations to prosecute suspected national security leakers. AP hide caption

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AP

Once Reserved For Spies, Espionage Act Now Used Against Suspected Leakers

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President Donald Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi reach to shake hands during their meeting in the Oval Office on Monday. Concerns in New Delhi have centered on whether India will remain a priority relationship for the U.S. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump And India's Modi Share Similarities, But A Host Of Issues Divides Them

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An officer stands at the Fresnes Prison in France in September 2016. Fresnes was the first French prison to separate radicalized inmates from the general prison population. Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images

Inside French Prisons, A Struggle To Combat Radicalization

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Philippine Sen. Leila de Lima, a former human rights commissioner and one of President Rodrigo Duterte's most vocal opponents, waves to supporters after appearing at a court in suburban Manila on Feb. 24. She was arrested on drug-related charges that she denies. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Jailed Philippine Senator: 'I Won't Be Silenced Or Cowed'

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A billboard in Taif, Saudi Arabia, shows King Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud (center) flanked by his 31-year-old son, Mohammed bin Salman (right), and Prince Mohammed bin Nayef. The king appointed his son as his successor and first in line to the throne, stripping Nayef of the title of crown prince and ousting him from his powerful position of interior minister. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

What To Know About Saudi Arabia's New Crown Prince And The Issues He Will Face

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German forces Bundeswehr officers enter the German Defense Ministry prior to a meeting between Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen and about 100 top officers in Berlin last month. The meeting was about the arrest of an army officer on suspicion that he was part of a small group planning a far-right attack. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

After Arrests, Germany Confronts Issue Of Far-Right Extremism In Its Military

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Kuwaiti Emir Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Jaber Al Sabah (left) met with Qatari Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani in Doha, Qatar, earlier this month as the Kuwaiti leader tried to mediate an end to the regional crisis. But analysts warn there will be no quick or easy resolution. AP hide caption

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AP

Visitors and medical personnel enter a transport plane carrying Otto Warmbier at a Cincinnati regional airport Tuesday. Warmbier, who was released and medically evacuated from North Korea, has been in a coma for months, his parents said. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

After Otto Warmbier's Release, Will U.S. Ban Travel To North Korea?

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The bipartisan amendment expands existing sanctions on Russia. The Senate will consider it as part of an Iran sanctions bill that already has wide support. Arturo Pardavila III/Flickr hide caption

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Arturo Pardavila III/Flickr

Senators Aim To Make It Harder For Trump Administration To Ease Russia Sanctions

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Anti-government protesters march in Novosibirsk, the capital of Siberia and Russia's third most populous city, with a banner reading "Corruption steals the future!" Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Lucian Kim/NPR