Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

Parallels

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Politics & Policy

Hillary Clinton gives a speech Thursday, the final day of the Democratic National Convention, and Donald Trump speaks on July 21, the last day of the Republican National Convention. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images; Jim Watson/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images; Jim Watson/Getty Images

In Russia's view, Hillary Clinton's campaign has raised the email hacking issue to draw attention away from the content of the leaked emails. Dake Kang/AP hide caption

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Dake Kang/AP

After Hacking Claims, Here's The View From Russia On The U.S. Campaign

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Crawley has been around since Roman times, but it grew substantially after the Second World War to absorb people from bombed-out parts of London, some 30 miles north. Its St. John's Church was constructed in the 13th century. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

In A British Town Full Of EU Workers, Brexit Vote Brings Uncertainty

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Russia recently introduced a new frigate, the Admiral Grigorovich, and invited journalists on board at the Russian base in Sevastopol, Crimea. While the Russians have had a naval base in Sevastopol since the 18th century, Russia's seizure of the entire Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine in 2014 has heightened tensions with NATO. Corey Flintoff/NPR hide caption

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Corey Flintoff/NPR

The View From A Russian Frigate In Crimea

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Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (in suit and green tie) inspects a police honor guard as he arrives at the parliament in Ankara on Friday. A July 15 coup attempt was quickly crushed in Turkey, a country that has had multiple military takeovers in the past. Burhan Ozbilici/AP hide caption

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Burhan Ozbilici/AP

The Chinese government-selected Panchen Lama, Gyaincain Norbu (right), took part in the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing on March 14. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (right), and British Prime Minister Theresa May (left), listen to translations during a joint news conference in Berlin on July 20. They are the two most important figures in the negotiations over Britain's departure from the European Union, the so-called Brexit. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

The Two Female Leaders Who Have To Figure Out The Brexit

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Video screens Wednesday night in Istanbul's Taksim Square show President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as he announced a three-month state of emergency following last Friday's failed coup. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Turkey Begins 3-Month State Of Emergency Amid Ongoing Crackdown

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Secretary of State John Kerry talks with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in Vienna on Jan. 16, after the International Atomic Energy Agency verified that Iran met all conditions under the nuclear deal. The accord is now 1-year-old. Iran is seen as abiding by requirements of the deal, but its relations with the U.S. and other rivals have not improved on other fronts. Kevin Lamarque/AP hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/AP

Turkish police in the city of Mugla on Sunday detain members of the military suspected of involvement in Friday's attempted coup. Following the failed revolt, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's government has moved swiftly, detaining some 7,000 suspects, many in the military and the government. Tolga Adanali/AP hide caption

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Tolga Adanali/AP

Turkey's President Cracks Down After Failed Coup

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Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen (right) receives a vase from Israel's Chief Rabbi Eliyahu Bakshi Doron during a meeting in Istanbul, Turkey, in 1998. Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Saturday accused Gulen of involvement in a coup attempt, a charge Gulen denied. Murad Sezer/AP hide caption

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Murad Sezer/AP

Former Florida Senator Bob Graham, shown here in 2011, co-chaired the congressional inquiry into possible Saudi government links to the Sept. 11 hijackers. He long advocated releasing the 2002 report, known as the "28 pages," which were made public on Friday. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

People lay flowers Friday near the seafront in Nice in tribute to victims of Thursday's truck attack that killed more than 80 people. France has suffered three major terrorist attacks since 2015 and appears as vulnerable as any Western nation. Clément Mahoudeau/IP3/Getty Images hide caption

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Clément Mahoudeau/IP3/Getty Images

People line up to buy groceries outside a supermarket in Caracas, Venezuela's capital, on July 13. The State Department issued a travel warning for the country on July 7. Four other countries have been the subject of U.S. travel warnings since July 1. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Often Issues Travel Warnings, But Lately The Tables Are Turned

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Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro waves to supporters as he walks with his wife Cilia Flores in the capital Caracas on July 5, Venezuela's Independence Day. As the country's crisis has deepened, Maduro has lost support, but the military remains on his side. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

Venezuela's Embattled President Loses Support, But Clings To Power

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