Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

Parallels

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Politics & Policy

U.S. District Judge Michael Davis of Minneapolis allowed Abdullahi Yusuf to take part in a jihadi rehabilitation program after he pleaded guilty last year to a plan to join ISIS. Jeff Baenen/AP hide caption

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Jeff Baenen/AP

Parents Speak Out, Say FBI Arrest Saved Son On Verge Of Joining ISIS

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Israeli President Shimon Peres addresses members of the Foreign Press Association during a visit to the southern Israeli town of Sderot in July 2014, following Palestinian rocket attacks on the city. Peres, who would go on to retire at the end of that month, said, "I'm retiring from the post of president but I am not retiring for the battle for peace." Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images

Shimon Peres, The Last Of Israel's Founding Leaders, Dies At 93

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NPR's David Welna had personal documents posted by a pro-Kremlin website when he applied for press credentials in Ukraine. He's far from the only one. But it's an issue the U.S. is reluctant to discuss. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Russian Hackers Doxxed Me. What Should I Do About It?

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Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses the audience at the United Russia party congress held in Moscow in June, three months ahead of parliamentary elections this Sunday. His party is expected to retain its majority. Maxim Shipenkov/AP hide caption

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Maxim Shipenkov/AP

In Russia, A New Parliament Is Expected To Act Much Like The Old One

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Ghada and Osama sit on their deck in their new home in Princeton, N.J. Their family has been resettled from Syria and is being sponsored by the Nassau Presbyterian Church. Due to security concerns we are only including first names. Jake Naughton for NPR hide caption

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Jake Naughton for NPR

Skyscrapers in the mainland China city of Xiamen are seen in the distance from a beach on Taiwan's Kinmen Island. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

On A Rural Taiwanese Island, Modern China Beckons

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Syrians run for cover during reported government air strikes in the rebel-held town of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, on Sept. 9. Under the plan announced Friday, hostilities are to cease starting at sundown Sept. 12, the start of the Eid al-Adha holiday. Abd Doumany/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Abd Doumany/AFP/Getty Images

A Chinese flag flies on a boat next to the bridge that spans the Yalu River linking the North Korean town of Sinuiju with the Chinese town of Dandong. Most of North Korea's trade is with China, and much of it crosses the border here. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

A U.S. Predator drone sits on the tarmac at the Kandahar military airport in southern Afghanistan in 2010. The U.S. has been using drones more and more frequently since the Sept. 11 attacks. They have been highly effective on the battlefield, but have raised legal and ethical issues. Massoud Hossaini /AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini /AP

The Rise Of The Drone, And The Thorny Questions That Have Followed

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North Korean restaurants, like this one in Vientiane, Laos, are run by the North Korean government as a way to earn hard currency. North Korea and Laos have had good relations for many years, but South Korea is trying to make inroads as well. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Laos: A Remote Battleground For North And South Korea

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Nesrine Kenza (right) wears a burkini at the beach with two friends in Marseille, France, on Aug. 29. Courts have struck down bans on the burkini, but the debate has carried on and is now being raised by presidential candidates. AP hide caption

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AP

Beach Season Winds Down, But Burkini Debate Rages On In France

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Islamic State fighters march in Raqqa, Syria, in an undated file photo released in 2014. The U.S. has been bombing ISIS in Syria and Iraq for the past two years. A U.S. Army captain has sued President Obama, arguing the U.S. war against the extremist group is not legal because the U.S. Congress has not authorized it. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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Uncredited/AP

When The U.S. Military Strikes, White House Points To A 2001 Measure

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Yuan Shanshan holds her 5-month-old baby on the outskirts of Beijing. Her husband, human rights lawyer Xie Yanyi, was arrested last year on charges of inciting subversion, and she's waiting until he's released to name the child. Xie is expected to stand trial soon. He's among a large number of Chinese human rights lawyers who have been prosecuted in the past year. Anthony Kuhn / NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn / NPR

New Challenge For China's Human Rights Lawyers: Defending Themselves

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Pro-government supporters in Ankara wave Turkish flags and hold signs showing Fethullah Gulen on July 20. The sign says "The coup nation traitor, FETO." FETO stands for "Fethullah Terrorist Organization." Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

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Hussein Malla/AP

In Turkey, The Man To Blame For Most Everything Is A U.S.-Based Cleric

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When the littoral combat ship USS Coronado set sail from Pearl Harbor for a planned deployment across the Pacific, it suffered engine problems and had to turn back. The Navy is struggling to get its new class of warships to work as planned. MC2 Ryan J. Batchelder/U.S. Navy hide caption

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MC2 Ryan J. Batchelder/U.S. Navy