Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

Parallels

Many Stories, One World

Politics & Policy

The main square of Batea, a town of about 2,000 residents in Spain's northeast region of Catalonia. The mayor opposes Sunday's independence referendum and has not given permission for voting to take place in municipal buildings. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Frayer for NPR

In Spain, Catalans Are Divided Over Independence Vote As Referendum Approaches

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/554027037/554057410" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In his Tuesday speech at the Sorbonne in Paris, French President Emmanuel Macron called Europe "our history, identity, our horizon and what protects us and gives us our future." Ludovic Marin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ludovic Marin/AP

The far-right Alternative for Germany party came in third place nationally, but in the eastern state of Saxony, where the town of Pirna is located, the party finished first with 27 percent of the vote. Jens Schlueter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jens Schlueter/Getty Images

At Urumqi's Grand Bazaar, a police officer chats with a local vendor while a video promoting China's ethnic minorities plays on a big screen overlooking the square. This was the site of Uighur protests in 2009 that sparked citywide riots, leading to the death of hundreds. Since then, the city has become one of China's most tightly controlled police states. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rob Schmitz/NPR

Wary Of Unrest Among Uighur Minority, China Locks Down Xinjiang Region

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/553463964/553662031" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A poster in Essen showing women in traditional German dress promotes the far-right party Alternative for Germany. The poster says, "Colorful variety? We have already." Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Meissner/AP

Alice Weidel and Alexander Gauland, leading candidates of the right-wing, populist Alternative for Germany (AfD) political party, stand near an AfD poster that reads: "Crime Through Immigration, The Refugee Wave Leaves Behind Clues!" Sept. 18 in Berlin. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Kurds wave Israeli flags at a Kurdish independence rally. Israel is the only country in the region to support the referendum. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jane Arraf/NPR

What To Know About The Independence Referendum In Iraqi Kurdistan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/552571060/552842315" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People hold a banner reading "I am not afraid" in the Catalan language during an Aug. 26 demonstration condemning the attacks that killed 16 people last month in Barcelona. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manu Fernandez/AP

After Barcelona Attacks, Catalans Look Ahead To Independence Vote

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547909330/547964128" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, arrives for a welcome ceremony for Tajikistan's President Emomali Rahmon in Beijing on Thursday. State media announced a key Chinese Communist Party meeting held once every five years will start on Oct. 18. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Schiefelbein/AP

President Donald Trump, joined by Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, listens to a question during a meeting with Finnish President Sauli Niinisto in the Oval Office on Monday. Tillerson, when asked Sunday whether Trump's response to violence in Charlottesville, Va., represented American values, said that "the president speaks for himself." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

Are Trump's Foreign Policy Stumbles First-Year Growing Pains Or A Reason For Worry?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547298214/547373394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Conservative Party politician Jacob Rees-Mogg stands in the garden of his mansion in the west of England. Known for his posh, upper-class traits, Rees-Mogg has become an unlikely hit on social media. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Frank Langfitt/NPR

Marlene Schiappa started a blog, Maman Travaille (Mom Works), that quickly grew into a 10,000-woman advocacy network. As gender equality minister, she wants to criminalize sexual harassment on the streets. President Emmanuel Macron has tasked her with tackling pay inequity as well. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

France's Gender Equality Minister Wants On-The-Spot Fines For Sexual Harassers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545297078/546323263" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tunisian women gather to celebrate Women's Day on Aug. 13 in Tunis. On the same day, the country's president announced the review of a law requiring that a man receive twice the share of an inheritance as a woman. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

President Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shake hands in Jerusalem in May. Some critics say Netanyahu responded cautiously to the Charlottesville rally because he wanted to avoid angering Trump. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sebastian Scheiner/AP