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Gina Haspel (in white), the nominee to lead the CIA, is welcomed at her confirmation hearing before the Senate intelligence committee by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. (seated), and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., in Washington on May 9. The committee voted 10-5 on Wednesday to recommend Haspel's confirmation by the full Senate. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate Panel Approves Gina Haspel As CIA Chief; Confirmation Appears Likely

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Gina Haspel, the nominee to be CIA director, testifies at a Senate intelligence committee hearing on May 9. Haspel now appears to have enough Senate support to win confirmation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Former CIA director Gen. Michael Hayden delivers remarks on national security at the National Academy of Sciences in October. Hayden is among a growing number of former intelligence officials who are now speaking out regularly in retirement. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

In Retirement, America's Spies Are Getting Downright Chatty

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Gina Haspel, an undercover CIA officer for three decades, has been nominated to become director of the spy agency. Several senators say they will be asking tough questions about her role in the CIA's waterboarding program that began after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. CIA via AP hide caption

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CIA via AP

The CIA Introduces Gina Haspel After Her Long Career Undercover

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Secretary of State nominee Mike Pompeo answers questions during his confirmation hearing with the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on April 12. Pompeo traveled to North Korea for a secret meeting with President Kim Jong Un at the beginning of the month. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis speaks at the Pentagon Monday. The military received a big boost in funding last week, raising the overall budget to $700 billion this year. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

How The Pentagon Plans To Spend That Extra $61 Billion

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CIA Director Mike Pompeo speaks in Washington in January. The spy agency has become more open and active in recruiting staff, with the aim of greater diversity. Even Pompeo encourages job applications in his public remarks. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

CIA Recruiting: The Rare Topic The Spy Agency Likes To Talk About

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Soviet aviators with their American colleagues in front of a version of the PBY Catalina aircraft in Elizabeth City, N.C. The U.S. trained Soviet pilots to fly the plane as part of Project Zebra, a secret military program during World War II. Courtesy M.G. Crisci hide caption

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Courtesy M.G. Crisci

North Carolina Town Accepts, Then Spurns Russian Gift

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South Koreans at a railway station in Seoul watch a news report showing President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on March 9. Trump agreed the day before to a historic first meeting with Kim. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Gina Haspel, an undercover CIA officer for three decades, has been nominated to become director of the spy agency. Several senators say they will be asking tough questions about her role in the CIA's waterboarding program that began after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. AP via CIA hide caption

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AP via CIA

Mike Pompeo has been a leading critic of the nuclear deal with Iran and has said the U.S. would not soften its stance on North Korea ahead of planned talks between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Trump. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Mike Pompeo: A Soldier, Spy Chief And Tea Party Republican To Become A Diplomat

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Former NBA star Dennis Rodman presents the book The Art of the Deal to North Korea's Sports Minister Kim Il Guk last June in Pyongyang, North Korea. Until this week, Rodman was believed to be the only person who had met both Kim and the U.S. president. Kim Kwang Hyon/AP hide caption

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Kim Kwang Hyon/AP

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, center, heads to a meeting of the Russia's Central Election commission in December. Officials formally barred him Alexei Navalny from running for president in the March 18 election, which he says is a predetermined sham. Evgeny Feldman/AP hide caption

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Evgeny Feldman/AP

Banned From Election, Putin Foe Navalny Pursues Politics By Other Means

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CIA Director Mike Pompeo spoke Tuesday at the American Enterprise Institute about the daily briefing he provides to President Trump most mornings at the White House. He pushed back against reports that Trump is not engaged. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images