Conflict Zones : Parallels Very few internal or cross-border disputes these days stay hidden from the wider world. Friendly nations end up embroiled in others' wars and neighbors become peacemakers. This is where we look at our connections during chaos and calm.

Smoke rises from buildings in the area of Bughayliyah, on the northern outskirts of Deir ez-Zor on Sept. 13, as Syrian forces advance during their ongoing battle against ISIS. George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images

Pakistan's prime minister, Shahid Khaqan Abbasi (shown here Aug. 1), says that U.S. sanctions against Pakistan will only hurt its efforts to fight militants in the region. Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images

Bashar Abdul Jabar lost his 15-year-old son, Ahmed, when part of their house collapsed during fighting between Iraqi troops and ISIS. He returned to the city to retrieve his boy's body with the help of civil defense forces. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

South Korean soldiers participate in an anti-terror and anti-chemical terror exercise Ulchi Freedom Guardian exercise last year. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Fresh Threats From Pyongyang As Joint Military Exercise Begins

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The Israeli army facilitates the transfer of wounded Syrians to Israeli hospitals. Courtesy of the Israel Defense Forces hide caption

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Courtesy of the Israel Defense Forces

From Israel, Quiet Efforts Are Underway To Aid Civilians In Syria

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(Left) Vika, 10, in the underground room where she and her family sleep to stay safe from regular shelling in Spartak, Ukraine. (Right) Vika keeps her stuffed animals in this underground cubby, which also serves as a space to play. (Bottom) Vika and her grandmother, Valentina Pleshkova, 54. Brendan Hoffman/Prime for NPR hide caption

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Brendan Hoffman/Prime for NPR

Ruins are all that remain of the 12th century Great Mosque of al-Nuri, where ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declared three years ago that an Islamic state was rising again. ISIS blew the mosque up as Iraqi forces advanced. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

The Syrian city of Daraa, heavily hit by barrel bombs and other strikes by the Assad regime, is one of the areas covered by the current cease-fire. For the past eight days, residents have had a respite from the regime's attacks. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Smoke billows from the Marawi city center after an air attack by Philippine government troops on May 30. Philippine government troops have been battling ISIS-linked militants. Jes Aznar/Getty Images hide caption

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Jes Aznar/Getty Images

Omar Omar outside his family's home in the village of Deir Jarir. After living in the U.S. for decades, he sees the West Bank with the eyes of an outsider. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

For A Palestinian Father, Six-Day War Led To A Divided Life

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Israeli soldiers search Arab prisoners as Israeli forces take over the Old City in East Jerusalem on June 8, 1967, during the Arab-Israeli Six-Day War. Just 11 days after the war ended, U.S. President Lyndon Johnson offered the first of many peace proposals by U.S. presidents over the past half-century. AP hide caption

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AP

50 Years On, U.S. Presidents Still Seek Elusive Peace To A 6-Day War

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Mohammad Al Abdallah, the executive director of the Syria Justice and Accountability Centre, shows a video that was posted to YouTube of illegal cluster bombing in Syria. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Activists Build Human Rights Abuse Cases With Help From Cellphone Videos

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FARC guerrillas at a Colombia jungle camp last fall. Under last year's peace treaty, FARC agreed to disarm and confine its fighters to demobilization camps. But a small number of dissident rebels continue to extort business owners. Luis Acosta/AP hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AP

Dissident Rebels In Colombia Ignore Peace Treaty And Continue Extortion

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Afghan warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar speaks in eastern Afghanistan on Saturday. A prominent figure for decades in Afghanistan's war, Hekmatyar, 69, was known as the "Butcher of Kabul" when his forces rocketed the city in the 1990s. He made peace with the government and President Ashraf Ghani welcomed him back to the capital on Thursday. Mohammad Anwar Danishyar/AP hide caption

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Mohammad Anwar Danishyar/AP

The 'Butcher Of Kabul' Is Welcomed Back In Kabul

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FARC rebel Alfredo Gutierrez holds his month-old daughter, Desiree, as fellow FARC rebel Jenny Cabrales plays with her. Since the Colombian government and FARC leaders reached an agreement last year to end the war, rebel women have given birth to more than 60 babies. About 80 more are pregnant. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

After Peace Agreement, A Baby Boom Among Colombia's FARC Guerrillas

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Iraqi civilians evacuated from fighting in Mosul hand their IDs to a member of Iraqi special forces to check if they're on a list of suspected ISIS members. U.S.-backed Iraqi forces have been fighting ISIS in the city for six months and more than 300,000 civilians are still trapped by the fighting. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

As Iraqi Forces Encircle Mosul, ISIS Unleashes New Level Of Brutality On Civilians

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Helmeted Chadian and other African police commandos, armed with dummy rifles hunt down terrorist suspects who've taken hostages in the building, during a US military led Flintlock 2017 law enforcement exercise in Ndjamena Chad, 15 March 2017. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Mubashar Thanoun with his brother Ali, who was wounded in a U.S. airstrike in Mosul on March 17. Mubashar dug Ali out of the rubble of a collapsed building. He hasn't told him yet that his entire family died in the airstrike. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

A still from a video released by the U.S. Navy on Thursday evening shows the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) as it conducts strike operations while in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ford Williams hide caption

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U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ford Williams

Russia's deputy U.N. ambassador Vladimir Safronkov speaks during a Security Council meeting on the situation in Syria, Friday, at United Nations headquarters. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP