Markets : Parallels In a globalized economy, one country's success or failure can ripple across the world. We examine the interconnectedness of money, business and labor.

A young girl holds a sign with the words "1.2 Million Unemployed" during an anti-austerity protest in Lisbon on May 12, 2012. Armando Franca/AP hide caption

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Armando Franca/AP

Portugal Basks In Post-Bailout Economic Revival

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Designer Anastasiya Rudnik is a co-owner of the Ukrainian Street Wear shop in central Kiev. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Young Entrepreneurs Find Funky Niche In Products 'Made In Ukraine'

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40 year-old Longhua worker Wu Songtao and co-worker Wang Fuxiang stand at the bottom of their coal mine in Dalianhe. It's one of China's largest open-pit mines. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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As China's Coal Mines Close, Miners Are Becoming Bolder In Voicing Demands

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Tourists take pictures in front of Barcelona's Sagrada Familia church. The city of 1.6 million gets more than 30 million tourists a year. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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For Barcelona, Tourism Boom Comes At High Cost

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Members of the Indian media watch Rajiv Bansal, then the CFO of Infosys, during the announcement of the company's first quarter results in July 2014 in Bangalore. Indian software services firms draw tens of billions of dollars in revenue from U.S. contracts each year, and that's partly reliant exporting computer science talent on H-1B visas. Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Indian IT Outsourcers Anxious Over Potential Changes To H-1B Visas

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People line up to withdraw money from an ATM in Allahabad on Dec. 9. The government's removal of 500- and 1,000-rupee notes from circulation triggered a severe cash shortage. Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images

What Can India Teach Us About Abolishing High-Value Currency?

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Li Chunke, a carver at the state-owned Beijing Ivory Carving factory, at work in his Beijing workshop. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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In China, A Shift Away From Trade In Ivory and Shark Fins

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A man walks past a nearly deserted construction site Wednesday in Villa de Reyes, San Luis Potosi, Mexico, as workers shut down operations and remove equipment from the site of a canceled $1.6 billion Ford plant. Ford's cancellation, which costs the region thousands of projected jobs, has sounded alarms in Mexico and sent its currency tumbling. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Canceled Ford Plant Adds To Mexico's Economic Frustrations

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The Trump International Golf Club in Dubai is part of the president-elect's real estate empire. Trump has said his sons would run his companies while he's president. Karim Sahib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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For Global Investors, 'Uncertainty' Over Business Climate Under Trump

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A statue of Genghis Khan sits atop the stairs of the Government Palace in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia's capital. The country's economy has slowed down since the drop in gold and mineral prices. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Once Booming, Mongolia's Economy Veers From Riches To Rags

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A coal mining brigade unloads a cart full of coal that has been freshly mined from half-a-mile below the surface of the earth. For some rural Mongolians, risking their lives in crude, makeshift mines is the only way to survive. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Amid Economic Crisis, Mongolians Risk Their Lives For Do-It-Yourself Mining

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Donald Trump Jr. (left) and Eric Trump (right), sons of President-elect Donald Trump, pose with Philippine real estate developer Jose E.B. Antonio at a 2012 news conference in Manila announcing the launch of the Trump Tower Manila, a $150 million project that is now nearing completion. Pat Roque/AP hide caption

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Who's The New Philippine Envoy? The Man Building Trump Tower Manila

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An Egyptian man carries a bread tray in Cairo on Nov. 4. With the economy in crisis, prices have soared and many Egyptians are struggling to buy even basic goods. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amid Economic Crisis, Even Sugar Becomes A Luxury In Egypt

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A Chinese newspaper headline says "U.S. President-elect Donald Trump delivers a mighty shock to America." Trump has promised to label China a currency manipulator, which would pave the way to imposing high tariffs on Chinese imports. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Trump's China Stance Spurs Trade War Worries

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The skyline in Tel Aviv, the business capital of Israel. Some business leaders are calling for more Arabs in management. Arabs account for about 20 percent of Israel's citizens, but less than 1 percent of managers. JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Israel, A Push To Get More Arabs Into Management

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Wallonia leader Paul Magnette speaks to the media Wednesday prior to a meeting with Belgium's leaders. Wallonia objected to parts of a major European Union-Canada trade deal that was seven years in the making. But Magnette said Thursday he was willing accept the revised terms. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wallonia's premier, Paul Magnette, (center) leaves Tuesday after talks at Belgium's Foreign Ministry on the trade agreement between the European Union and Canada. All 29 governments involved support the deal, which has been seven years in the making, but Wallonia's opposition is blocking the deal. A signing ceremony had been set for Thursday. Jasper Jacobs /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A view of the Caribbean is among the things attracting new buyers to high-priced Havana real estate along the city's famous seaside strip, the Malecón. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

Amid A Struggling Economy, Cuban Real Estate Is Booming

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A private entrepreneur who sells house and kitchen supplies waits for customers in May at his home in Havana. Austerity measures in Cuba and a drop in subsidized fuel from Venezuela are hampering the economy. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Desmond Boylan/AP

Austerity Measures In Cuba Spark Fears Of A Return To Dark Economic Times

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Khalid al-Falih is shown at a conference in Riyadh in January, when he was still chairman of Saudi Arabia's state oil giant, Saudi Aramco. He became the country's oil minister in May. Saudi Arabia has been looking to diversify its holdings, and Aramco is reportedly looking to buy an oil refinery near the port of Houston. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

As Saudi Arabia Diversifies, A Texas Oil Refinery May Be In Its Future

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