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A crowd in central Damascus waves flags and portraits in support of President Bashar Assad on Monday, two days after the U.S., Britain and France carried out airstrikes. The photo was released by the official Syrian news agency SANA. AP hide caption

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AP

New evidence presented in a Washington, D.C., federal court claims that American journalist Marie Colvin, right, was killed in a targeted assassination by the Syrian regime in 2012. Arthur Edwards/AP hide caption

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Arthur Edwards/AP

Syrian Defector: Assad Forces Targeted, Killed Journalist Marie Colvin

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Young men outside Raqqa, Syria, training to find and destroy hidden explosive devices left by retreating ISIS forces. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

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Greg Dixon/NPR

ISIS' Parting Gift To Its Former Capital: Thousands Of Explosive Booby Traps

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Iranian President Hassan Rouhani speaks in a cabinet meeting in Tehran on Sunday. After a wave of economic protests swept major cities, Rouhani said people have the right to protest, but those demonstrations should not make the public "feel concerned about their lives and security." Uncredited/AP hide caption

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Uncredited/AP

Two civilians carry belongings they collected from their damaged house in the Old City of Mosul, Iraq. The Islamic State controlled the northern Iraqi city for three years before being driven out last year. ISIS no longer controls any cities, but small groups of fighters remain in Iraq and Syria, and are still considered a threat. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Where Did The Islamic State Fighters Go?

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Iranian President Hasan Rouhani delivers a speech during the opening session of the new Parliament in Tehran in 2016. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

What Is — And Isn't — Covered By The Iranian Nuclear Deal

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Displaced Syrians head to refugee camps on the outskirts of Raqqa on Sunday. Syrian fighters, backed by the U.S., have been driving out the Islamic State. However, many civilians are fleeing the fighting, and there's still no sign of a political settlement in Syria on the horizon. Bulent Kilic /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic /AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Is Beating Back ISIS, So What Comes Next?

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President Hassan Rouhani addresses Iran's Parliament on Aug. 20. He said the top foreign policy priority for his new government would be to protect the nuclear deal. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

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