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Left: Shelly C. Lowe, nominee for the chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Right: Maria Rosario Jackson, nominee for the National Endowment for the Arts chair Chris Richards; Photo courtesy of Maria Rosario Jackson/The National Endowment for the Humanities; the National Endowment for the Arts hide caption

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Chris Richards; Photo courtesy of Maria Rosario Jackson/The National Endowment for the Humanities; the National Endowment for the Arts

Michelle Zauner (L) of Japanese Breakfast performs with drummer Craig Hendrix at the Intersect music festival at the Las Vegas Festival Grounds on December 07, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images

You Are What You Cook

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Rather than a heroic journey, the story at the center of Blanchard's opera is one of self-discovery, with an assured, tactile specificity which includes a boistrous fraternity step routine that opens Act III. Ken Howard/Met Opera hide caption

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Ken Howard/Met Opera

Ben Platt won a Tony award in 2017 for his starring role in Dear Evan Hansen. Now he's starring in a new film adaptation of the musical. Brian Ach/Invision/AP hide caption

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Brian Ach/Invision/AP

'Dear Evan Hansen' Actor Ben Platt Escapes From Anxiety By Being In The Spotlight

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Will Liverman (center) as Charles in Terence Blanchard's Fire Shut Up in My Bones. Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera hide caption

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Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Terence Blanchard Makes History At The Metropolitan Opera

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Audra McDonald and Leslie Odom Jr. will host different parts of the Tony Awards broadcast on Sept. 26: the awards ceremony and the following two-hour celebration of Broadway's return, respectively. Associated Press hide caption

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Associated Press

4 Things To Know Ahead Of The 2021 Tony Awards

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People attending "The Lion King" arrive at the door as numerous Broadway shows re-open for the first time since closing in March 2020 on September 14, 2021 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

COVID Forever? Plus, Broadway's Back

Ever since the pandemic hit, life has been split into two timelines: before the pandemic and after the pandemic. But when will the "after" truly be after? Or will some version of the coronavirus be around... forever? Sam talks to The Atlantic staff writer Katherine Wu about continuing to live with some version of COVID-19. Plus, Sam talks to playwright Heidi Schreck and actress Cassie Beck, who are currently in rehearsals for the upcoming tour of the Broadway play What The Constitution Means to Me. As live theater returns, they talk about what the last 18 months have been like and how theater has changed for the long term.

COVID Forever? Plus, Broadway's Back

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People wait to attend the Broadway musical "Hamilton" after showing their vaccination cards on September 14, 2021 at the Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

To The Stage: After A Year Away, Broadway Is Back

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Kacey Musgraves, whose follow-up to her Album of the Year-winning Golden Hour, titled Star-Crossed, was released Sep. 10, 2021. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Kacey Musgraves: 'Star-Crossed' And Thriving

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A scene from Francisco Negrin's production of Verdi's Il Trovatore, shown in a performance from the Opera de Monte Carlo. Alain Hanel/courtesy of LA Opera hide caption

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Alain Hanel/courtesy of LA Opera

Faced With Deadline Drama, LA Opera Stages A Construction Sprint

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Curtains Up! Broadway Musicals Return, But COVID Concerns Are Center Stage

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