Performing Arts News, interviews, and commentary on theater, the arts, music, and dance.

Performing Arts

Denzel Washington and Frances McDormand in The Tragedy of Macbeth, directed by Joel Coen. Alison Rosa/A24/Apple TV+ hide caption

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Alison Rosa/A24/Apple TV+

Mackenzie Davis in a scene from Station Eleven. Ian Watson/HBO Max hide caption

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Ian Watson/HBO Max

Cecily Strong is putting her personal spin on a celebrated one-woman show at The Shed in New York City this month. Mary Ellen Matthews/NBC hide caption

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Mary Ellen Matthews/NBC

Cecily Strong finds 'Signs of Intelligent Life' in a celebrated one-woman show

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Sidney Poitier while filming In the Heat of the Night Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

Musician David Bowie speaks onstage while accepting the Webby Lifetime Achievement award at the 11th Annual Webby Awards in 2007. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images

David Bowie joins a list of stars whose back catalogs are sold for galactic sums

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The Broadway cast of Come From Away had to cancel a week's performances before Christmas due to a COVID-19 outbreak. When it returned, eight out of the 12 actors in the show were substitutes. Matthew Murphy/© 2021 "Come From Away" on Broadway hide caption

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Matthew Murphy/© 2021 "Come From Away" on Broadway

With COVID outbreaks, Broadway's understudies take center stage

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In the third part of our series exploring crossover in pop music, we reexamine the so-called "Latin explosion" of the '90s: what it was supposed to be for audiences across the U.S., and what it actually came to represent. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

Bonus Episode: The blessing and curse of the '90s Latin Pop Explosion

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Randy Malcom, from left, Alexander Delgado of Gente De Zona and Yotuel sing Patria y Vida at the Latin Grammy Awards on Nov. 18, 2021, in Las Vegas. Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Latin Grammy winner to Cuban leaders: 'We're done with your lies and indoctrination'

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Shola Adewusi (foreground) and the company in rehearsal for Merry Wives. When the show first began its run, the audiences were mostly white. Then, the organization piloted Black theater nights, says the Public Theater's artistic director, Oskar Eustis. "And we had two nights in which the Delacorte was 98 percent Black audiences, 1500 people a night." Joan Marcus/Courtesy of the Public Theater hide caption

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Joan Marcus/Courtesy of the Public Theater

Here's how theater directors have reimagined their work during the pandemic

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Jaquel Spivey performs as Usher in A Strange Loop at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company in Washington D.C. Teresa Castracane/Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company in Association with Playwrights Horizons and Page 73 Productions hide caption

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Teresa Castracane/Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company in Association with Playwrights Horizons and Page 73 Productions

A Pulitzer winner at the worst possible time, 'A Strange Loop' is Broadway-bound

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Iphigenia, played by esperanza spalding, prepares for her sacrifice. From Wayne Shorter and spalding's opera, ...(Iphigenia). Jon Fine/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jon Fine/Courtesy of the artist

Music educator Monica Levin teaches via video conference at Frances Fuchs Early Childhood Center in Prince George's County, Maryland. Jennifer Samson hide caption

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Jennifer Samson

For kids grappling with the pandemic's traumas, art classes can be an oasis

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Mel Brooks (shown here in 1984) calls comedy his "delicious refuge" from the world: "I hide in humor and comedy. I love it." Larry Ellis/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Larry Ellis/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Mel Brooks says his only regret as a comedian is the jokes he didn't tell

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The 2021 Kennedy Center honorees: (left to right) opera star Justino Díaz, Saturday Night Live creator Lorne Michaels, singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell, entertainer Bette Midler and Motown founder Berry Gordy. Scott Suchman/Kennedy Center hide caption

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Scott Suchman/Kennedy Center

Kennedy Center honors creative excellence in the arts at annual gala

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Brandon Michael Hall, LaChanze and Chuck Cooper in Roundabout Theatre Company's Trouble in Mind. Joan Marcus/Roundabout Theatre Company hide caption

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Joan Marcus/Roundabout Theatre Company

A prescient play about race in America has its long-overdue Broadway premiere

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