Photography Photography

Neil Leifer took this photograph of sprinter Carl Lewis during the 1984 Olympics. Lewis won four gold medals that year. Photo from Relentless: The Stories behind the Photographs, by Neil Leifer with Diane K. Shah (University of Texas Press, 2016) Neil Leifer/ Courtesy of Sports Illustrated Content Management hide caption

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Neil Leifer/ Courtesy of Sports Illustrated Content Management

A 'Relentless' Sports Photographer Explains How He Got His Shots

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A young man from Bali, Indonesia, shows off his rainbow-colored rooster before a cockfight. Courtesy of Ruben Salgado Escudero and the World Photography Organization hide caption

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Courtesy of Ruben Salgado Escudero and the World Photography Organization

"My home," exclaims Movses Haneshyan, on seeing the enlarged image presented to him by photographer Diana Markosian. He'd fled with his father at age 5. Diana Markosian hide caption

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Diana Markosian

Elsa Dorfman and Allen Ginsberg. The inscription on the bottom of the photo reads, "October 15, 1988. The morning after our reception at Vision." Elsa Dorfman hide caption

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Elsa Dorfman

To Access Her Big, Boxy Muse, Photographer Set Her Sights On Allen Ginsberg

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"[My father] said 'Kitra, my beauty, don't cry. This is a blessing.'" — Kitra Cahana Courtesy TEDMED hide caption

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Courtesy TEDMED

Can A Massive Stroke Change A Life — For The Better?

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Attendees view Bob Adelman's photography exhibit at the Westwood Gallery in New York City. Ray Tamarra/Getty Images hide caption

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Ray Tamarra/Getty Images

Bob Adelman, Who Photographed Iconic Civil Rights Moments, Dies

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"Really tiny motions or really fast motions — these are things that we don't typically see with our eyes." — Abe Davis Bret Hartman/TED hide caption

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Bret Hartman/TED

Abe Davis: How Can Hidden Sounds Be Captured By Everyday Objects

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In a historic collaboration, the Getty and LACMA are exhibiting their massive joint acquisition of Mapplethorpe's archives. Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation/courtesy of HBO hide caption

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Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation/courtesy of HBO

Robert Mapplethorpe's Provocative Art Finds A New Home In LA

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French criminologist Alphonse Bertillon's (left) techniques for identifying criminals in the late 19th century set the template that police use today. Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images hide caption

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Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images

Meet Alphonse Bertillon, The Man Behind The Modern Mug Shot

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