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Paul Salopek and his guide walk into the desert, on day 19 of the "Out of Eden walk" in the Afar region of Northeast Ethiopia. The walk with take about 7 years total. Paul Salopek/National Geographic hide caption

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Paul Salopek/National Geographic

Around The World In ... A Lot Of Steps

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An arctic fox pup, just beginning to show its white winter coat, plays with a lemming carcass. Wrangel's foxes subsist largely on these snow-burrowing rodents, whose numbers fluctuate wildly from year to year. Sergey Gorshkov/National Geographic hide caption

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Sergey Gorshkov/National Geographic

The bucardo, or Pyrenean ibex, lived high in the Pyrenees until its extinction in 2000. Three years later, researchers attempted to clone Celia, the last bucardo. The clone died minutes after birth. Taxidermic specimen, Regional Government of Aragon, Spain Robb Kendrick/National Geographic hide caption

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Robb Kendrick/National Geographic

It's Called 'De-Extinction' — It's Like 'Jurassic Park,' Except It's Real

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Kyrgyz girls slide plastic jugs back to their family's camp after chopping a hole in a frozen spring to fetch water. Men handle herding and trading; much of the hard labor of daily life falls to the females. Matthieu Paley/National Geographic hide caption

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Matthieu Paley/National Geographic

"I drove out past the town of Marion beneath a quiet sky, as beautiful as anything I'd seen, to the house of a woman who lived by herself." 1969 Eugene Richards/Magnum Photos hide caption

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Eugene Richards/Magnum Photos

Looking For Lost Memories In The Delta

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The giant sequoia is a snow tree, says scientist Steve Sillett, adapted for long winters in the Sierra Nevada. But it's a fire tree, too. Thick bark protects it from burning in lightning-caused fires, which open cones and clear the understory, allowing saplings to find light and prosper. Michael Nichols/National Geographic hide caption

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Michael Nichols/National Geographic

A worker emerges from one of hundreds of smuggling tunnels that connect the Gaza Strip and Egypt. Paolo Pellegrin/National Geographic hide caption

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Paolo Pellegrin/National Geographic

"A sculpture like this can take a master carver years to produce. Front and center are the popular Taoist gods Shou, Lu and Fu — symbols of long life, money, and luck. 'We hope — no, we insist — we can continue to protect these skills,' says Wang Shan, secretary-general of the China Arts and Crafts Association." Brent Stirton/National Geographic hide caption

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Brent Stirton/National Geographic