PHOTOS: Argentina, Chile Witness An Eclipse : The Picture Show Chile and Argentina got their turn to host a total solar eclipse. People brought out special glasses, and even protective suits, to watch the celestial event.
NPR logo PHOTOS: Solar Eclipse Shrouds Parts Of South America In Temporary Darkness

PHOTOS: Solar Eclipse Shrouds Parts Of South America In Temporary Darkness

July 2's total solar eclipse as seen from La Silla Observatory in Chile. Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

July 2's total solar eclipse as seen from La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

The moon seemed to take over the sun, shrouding parts of South America and the southern Pacific in complete darkness — during the day.

The path of Tuesday's total solar eclipse included Chile and Argentina, where people brought out special glasses, and even suits (you'll see those below), to witness the celestial show.

The eclipse path also fell on scientific facilities such as La Silla Observatory in Chile and the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, also in Chile.

For you eclipse fans out there, the next total solar eclipse will take place again in Chile and Argentina on Dec. 14, 2020, according to NASA. The next total solar eclipse to come through the U.S. will be on April 8, 2024.

So if you're planning to go in person, you've got some time to prepare and protect those eyeballs.

Observers in Paiguano, Chile, watch the sky while donning special suits prior to the total solar eclipse. Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

Observers in Paiguano, Chile, watch the sky while donning special suits prior to the total solar eclipse.

Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

Tens of thousands of tourists braced Tuesday for the rare total solar eclipse. Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

Tens of thousands of tourists braced Tuesday for the rare total solar eclipse.

Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

Chileans in Paiguano watch the sky prior to the solar eclipse on July 2. Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

Chileans in Paiguano watch the sky prior to the solar eclipse on July 2.

Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

This combination of pictures created on July 2 shows different stages of the eclipse, as seen from La Silla Observatory. Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

This combination of pictures created on July 2 shows different stages of the eclipse, as seen from La Silla Observatory.

Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

The solar eclipse as seen from the Congreso neighborhood of Buenos Aires, Argentina, on July 2. Alejandro Pagni/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alejandro Pagni/AFP/Getty Images

The solar eclipse as seen from the Congreso neighborhood of Buenos Aires, Argentina, on July 2.

Alejandro Pagni/AFP/Getty Images

A young Chilean in Paiguano watches the sky with eclipse glasses prior to the total solar eclipse. Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

A young Chilean in Paiguano watches the sky with eclipse glasses prior to the total solar eclipse.

Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

Chileans in Paiguano watch the sky prior to the solar eclipse. Thousands of tourists arrived at the small town of about 1,000 inhabitants in the Elqui Valley. Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

Chileans in Paiguano watch the sky prior to the solar eclipse. Thousands of tourists arrived at the small town of about 1,000 inhabitants in the Elqui Valley.

Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

The solar eclipse as seen from Porto Alegre, Brazil. Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images

The solar eclipse as seen from Porto Alegre, Brazil.

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A worker puts finishing touches on a giant pair of eclipse sunglasses at the entrance of La Higuera — about 360 miles north of Santiago, the Chilean capital. Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

A worker puts finishing touches on a giant pair of eclipse sunglasses at the entrance of La Higuera — about 360 miles north of Santiago, the Chilean capital.

Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

The entrance of an astronomical camp that expected to receive thousands of tourists to observe the eclipse, in Vallenar in the Atacama Desert, about 375 miles north of Santiago. Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

The entrance of an astronomical camp that expected to receive thousands of tourists to observe the eclipse, in Vallenar in the Atacama Desert, about 375 miles north of Santiago.

Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images