Haunting photos capture the remnants of everyday life in Ukraine : The Picture Show In ruined residential dwellings of the liberated Ukrainian cities of Irpin and Borodianka, humanity's hopes and dreams — in war, merely "collateral damage" — are reduced to ash.

Haunting photos capture the remnants of everyday life in Ukraine

Haunting photos capture the remnants of everyday life in Ukraine

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Broken windows, fragmented lives. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Broken windows, fragmented lives.

Carol Guzy

Six months after Russia has invaded Ukraine, and on the 31st Independence Day of Ukraine commemorating their departure from the Soviet Union in 1991, we look at the result of the war and what remains...

Eerie paintings in shades of burnt sienna. Remnants of everyday life, frozen in a macabre stillness at the precise moment time stopped when Russian bombs rained down on residential dwellings in the liberated towns of Irpin and Borodianka. Exquisite light kisses the scorched palette. Baby cribs and wheelchairs. Charred cameras that once held tender family photos. A coffee cup sits on a table near a recliner, singed and flaking. A kitchen table holds food left uneaten. What were they cooking that last day of normal?

Life, Interrupted. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Life, Interrupted.

Carol Guzy

Vacant mirrors, empty chairs. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Vacant mirrors, empty chairs.

Carol Guzy

Last supper. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Last supper.

Carol Guzy

Lives led, now put on hold. Or extinguished. Precious mementoes reduced to dust. Twisted metal, empty chairs, melted microwaves. Too painful to ponder what the power of these weapons of destruction does to human flesh at the point of impact.

Unsweet dreams. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Unsweet dreams.

Carol Guzy

Familiar things. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Familiar things.

Carol Guzy

Melted microwaves. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Melted microwaves.

Carol Guzy

Civilian things. Not the stuff of combatants. Humanity's hopes, dreams, loves — in war, they are merely "collateral damage."

Shadows of life. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Shadows of life.

Carol Guzy

The moment time stopped. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

The moment time stopped.

Carol Guzy

Death's ballet. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Death's ballet.

Carol Guzy

Books unread. An accordion of ash. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Books unread. An accordion of ash.

Carol Guzy

A popular cat café, once the scene of camaraderie and conversations over cappuccinos, lies in ruins. Broken glass becomes a metaphor for shattered lives. Survivors, saved from the bombardment by a fickle destiny of circumstance, visit in bittersweet homecomings to pick through pieces of their former reality.

Echoes of Everyday. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Echoes of Everyday.

Carol Guzy

Altered destiny. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Altered destiny.

Carol Guzy

Faded Memories. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Faded Memories.

Carol Guzy

Others will never return. Their life's breath now a faded memory among cherished keepsakes scattered in living rooms of ash.

Façade of destruction. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

Façade of destruction.

Carol Guzy

War's Legacy. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

War's Legacy.

Carol Guzy

The sunflower is an unofficial national symbol of peace in Ukraine and has been used worldwide to show support since the invasion. In 1996 sunflowers were planted by Ukrainian, Russian and U.S. defense ministers in a ceremony at a missile base commemorating Ukraine giving up nuclear weapons. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

The sunflower is an unofficial national symbol of peace in Ukraine and has been used worldwide to show support since the invasion. In 1996 sunflowers were planted by Ukrainian, Russian and U.S. defense ministers in a ceremony at a missile base commemorating Ukraine giving up nuclear weapons.

Carol Guzy

What remains... Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

What remains...

Carol Guzy

Carol Guzy is a 4-time Pulitzer Prize winning photographer for her work in Haiti, Kosovo and Colombia. She worked as a staff photographer at the Miami Herald from 1980 - 1988 and at The Washington Post from 1988 - 2014. She is currently a contract photographer for Zuma Press. Follow Carol on Instagram.