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The U.S. Census Bureau, headquartered in Suitland, Md., is facing a lawsuit over its long-standing policy of counting unauthorized immigrants in census numbers used to redistribute seats in Congress. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In an interview with NPR, U.S. Census Bureau's Acting Director Ron Jarmin discussed how the bureau is preparing for the upcoming 2020 census, including the controversial new citizenship question. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Acting U.S. Census Bureau Director Ron Jarmin stands in the lobby of the agency's headquarters in Suitland, Md. The bureau is facing six lawsuits from more than two dozen states and cities, plus other groups, that want a new question about U.S. citizenship removed from the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Citizenship Question Controversy Complicating Census 2020 Work, Bureau Director Says

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Progressive challenger Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez celebrates at a victory party last week. America's lawmakers skew older, and they skew male — but this year's elections may reverse that trend. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Heins/Getty Images

Life As A Young Woman Candidate: Fending Off 'Older Men' And Being An Outsider

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Donald Trump greets a crowd, including many younger supporters, after delivering his acceptance speech at the New York Hilton Midtown on election night 2016. Many younger voters have left the GOP since Trump took office. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Rick Scott joined a January event on the ongoing relief efforts for those affected by Hurricane Maria in Florida and Puerto Rico. With a growing bloc of voters from the island in Florida, the Republican Scott and Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson have been attacking each other over the issue of relief efforts in Puerto Rico in their high-stakes Senate campaign. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

At Issue In Florida Senate Campaign: Who's Fighting For Puerto Rico?

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, appears before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform to discuss the 2020 census, in Washington, D.C., in October 2017. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Documents Shed Light On Decision To Add Census Citizenship Question

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From left Bishop James Shannon, Rabbi Abraham Heschel, Dr. Martin Luther King and Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath. Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington Cemetery, February 6, 1968. Charles Del Vecchio/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Del Vecchio/Washington Post/Getty Images

Stacey Evans (left) and Stacey Abrams (right), the two candidates running for governor in the Georgia Democratic primary on May 22. They have plenty of similarities: they're both women named Stacey; they're both former legislators in the Georgia House of Representatives; they're both lawyers; and they're both calling for similar progressive policies, such as expanding Medicaid. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

Supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump watch as Fox News projects him the winner in Florida on Nov. 8, 2016. Fox is joining the Associated Press in a new experiment to measure voter preferences, which will be key to their projections on election night in 2018. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Democrat Stacey Abrams greets voters at an early vote event in DeKalb County, Ga. Abrams is in a competitive Democratic primary with an opponent who shares the same first name, Stacey Evans. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

50 States And No Black Governors, But That Could Change In 2018

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Why Painting A Black Boy's Nails Isn't 'Going Against His Culture'

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North Carolina Democratic Rep. Alma Adams is one of the 27 women who come away from Tuesday's primaries with a spot on the general election ballot. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images

John Gore, acting head of the Justice Department's civil rights division, (right) shakes hands with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Washington, D.C., in April. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Rapper Kanye West and President-elect Donald Trump met in 2016 at Trump Tower in New York. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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What The Kanye Controversy Can Teach Us About Black Voters

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Supporters of Donald Trump celebrate on election night 2016 at the New York Hilton Midtown. Despite the Republicans' current political advantage, many conservatives still feel like they are losing their grip on the country. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Despite So Much Winning, The Right Feels Like It's Losing

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Bill Cosby walks after it was announced a verdict is in at the Montgomery County Courthouse for day fourteen of his sexual assault retrial on April 26, 2018 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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