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Attorney General William Barr speaks about the redacted version of the Mueller report as U.S. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (right) and U.S. Acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Ed O'Callaghan listen at the Department of Justice Thursday before the document's release. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Assistant Attorney General Brian Benczkowski said Wednesday that if doctors or pharmacists behave like drug dealers, the Justice Department would prosecute them accordingly. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

President Trump participates in a roundtable on immigration and border security at the U.S. Border Patrol Calexico Station in Calexico, Calif., on April 5. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

U.S. Attorney General William Barr decided on Tuesday that asylum-seekers who clear a "credible fear" interview and are facing removal don't have the right to be released on bond by an immigration court judge while their cases are pending. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Los Angeles artist Erik Brunetti, the founder of the streetwear clothing company "FUCT," leaves the Supreme Court after his trademark case was argued on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Dances Around The F-Word With Real Potential Financial Consequences

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A branch of Deutsche Bank in Frankfurt, Germany. The company has received subpoenas from two U.S. House committees about its business dealings with President Trump. Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange makes his way into the Westminster Magistrates' Court after being arrested April 11 in London. Alberto Pezzali/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto Pezzali/NurPhoto/Getty Images

What Does Julian Assange's Arrest Mean For WikiLeaks And U.S. Elections?

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People gather outside Nuss Truck & Equipment in Burnsville, Minn., on April 15 as President Trump arrives for an event to tout his 2017 tax law. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Trump Begins Effort To Flip Minnesota, Which Was A Democratic Holdout In 2016

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Attorney General William Barr has signaled that he will play a rather different role from recent predecessors who were caught between warring executive and legislative powers. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn Carter, at the inauguration of President Trump on Jan. 20, 2017. On Saturday, Trump and Jimmy Carter spoke for the first time, discussing China. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Mayor Pete Buttigieg in downtown South Bend, Ind., in January, 2019. First elected in 2011, Buttigieg has based his presidential candidacy, in part, around the revival of South Bend that he's helped engineer. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

In this March 24, 2019 photo, The White House is seen behind security barriers in Washington. A White House official turned whistleblower says dozens of people in President Donald Trump's administration were granted access to classified information despite "disqualifying issues" in their backgrounds including concerns about foreign influence, drug use and criminal conduct. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Whistleblower Protections Key Tool To Investigators Probing Waste And Abuse Of Power

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Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont says he is set to release his tax returns Monday. For the first time in his career, it's been revealed that Sanders is now, in fact, a millionaire. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters that he is considering sending immigrants in the country illegally to "sanctuary cities" as retribution against Democrats, an idea his administration said had been rejected after reports emerged Thursday night. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Clockwise from top right: Lt. Col. "B" Fram, Kathryn Fram, Peg Fram, Alivya Fram, Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

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Amr Alfiky/NPR

How The Trump Administration's Transgender Troop Ban Is Affecting One Military Family

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