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Former U.S. Deputy Treasury Secretary Sarah Bloom Raskin, shown here before the opening ceremony of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation finance ministers meeting in Beijing in 2014 is one of the three nominees President Joe Biden announced for the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors on Friday. Andy Wong/AP file photo hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP file photo

Biden announces three more Federal Reserve nominees

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The Supreme Court's vote to invalidate the vaccine-or-test regulation was 6 to 3, along ideological lines. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Supreme Court blocks Biden's vaccine-or-test mandate for large private companies

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Stewart Rhodes, founder of the Oath Keepers, speaks during a 2017 rally outside the White House. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Oath Keepers leader arrested, charged with seditious conspiracy for Jan. 6 riot

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Then-candidate Joe Biden walks on stage to begin the first presidential debate in September 2020. The 2020 faceoffs may be the last of their kind. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Republicans threaten to skip traditional general election debates

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and other Republicans are attempting to reframe the "big lie" as an attack on voting rights legislation pushed by Democrats. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Internal GOP conflicts about 2020 election surface as party fights new voting bills

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Former President Donald Trump at a rally in Phoenix, Ariz., on July 24, 2021. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Pressed on his election lies, former President Trump cuts NPR interview short

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday. Senate Democrats are trying to advance voting rights legislation, which would require changing Senate rules to pass. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Justice Department building on a foggy morning in 2019 in Washington, D.C. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The Justice Department will create domestic terrorism unit to counter rising threats

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical adviser to the president, holds up printouts from Sen. Rand Paul's reelection campaign website. Greg Nash/AP hide caption

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Greg Nash/AP

A health worker grabs at-home COVID-19 test kits to be handed out last month in Youngstown, Ohio. Starting Saturday, private health insurers will be required to cover up to eight at-home COVID-19 tests per month for those on their plans, the Biden administration announced Monday. David Dermer/AP hide caption

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David Dermer/AP

President Biden and Vice President Harris will renew the administration's push for federal action to protect voting rights during a trip to Georgia on Tuesday. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images