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Protesters gather outside the U.S. Courthouse in Los Angeles to defend abortion rights on May 3, 2022, after a Supreme Court opinion overturning Roe v. Wade was leaked. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Abortion rights activists rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court after the overturning of Roe v. Wade on Friday. A poll taken after the decision showed 56% disapprove of it. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Poll: Majorities oppose Supreme Court's abortion ruling and worry about other rights

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The parties included this image, of Coach Kennedy praying with a crowd after the homecoming game, in their joint appendix submitted to the Supreme Court Court Filings hide caption

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Court Filings

Supreme Court backs a high school coach's right to pray on the 50-yard line

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Committee members arrive as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a nearly year-long investigation. Mandel Ngan/AP hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AP

Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul speaks as hundreds protesters gathered on June 24 in Union Square in New York City, N.Y., to protest against the U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Darren Bailey, Illinois state Senator and Republican candidate for governor, speaks alongside former President Donald Trump on Saturday, June 25, 2022, during a rally at the Adams County Fairgrounds in Mendon, Ill. Trump has endorsed Bailey in the race. Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio

Some of the country's richest people try to influence the Illinois race for governor

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Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat who is up for reelection this fall, speaks to abortion-rights protesters at a rally following the U.S Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade outside the state capitol in Lansing, Mich., Friday, June 24, 2022. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

A screenshot from a television ad promoting Chris Mathys, who ran for the GOP nomination in California's 22d Congressional district, was paid for by a Democratic political action committee. House Majority PAC hide caption

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House Majority PAC

Democrats are bankrolling ads promoting fringe Republican candidates. Here's why

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Thousands of abortion-rights activists gather in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after it overturned the landmark Roe v Wade case and erased a federal right to an abortion. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden appears with other G7 leaders on Sunday, as a summit at Elmau Castle in the German Alps gets underway. Biden announced a $200 billion U.S. investment as part of a global infrastructure project by major democracies to counter China's investments in developing countries. JONATHAN ERNST/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JONATHAN ERNST/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Mary Miller, R-Ill., told a crowd at a Save America Rally with former President Donald Trump that the end of Roe v. Wade was "a historic victory for white life." Her campaign told NPR she meant to say "a victory for Right to Life." Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

President Biden waves as he walks past Bavarian mountain riflemen and traditional costumers after his arrival in Germany on Saturday ahead of the G-7 summit. Daniel Karmann/AP hide caption

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Daniel Karmann/AP

President Biden addresses the nation Friday following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Anti-abortion activists rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 6. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, ending right to abortion upheld for decades

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President Joe Biden arrives to speak at the White House on Friday after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A group photo of the justices at the Supreme Court in Washington on April 23, 2021. Seated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor. Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett. Erin Schaff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Schaff/AFP via Getty Images

Abortion rights demonstrators hold signs outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Friday. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
Tracy Lee for NPR

For doctors, abortion restrictions create an 'impossible choice' when providing care

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From left, Steven Engel, former assistant attorney general for the Office of Legal Counsel, Jeffrey Rosen, former acting attorney general, and Richard Donoghue, former acting deputy attorney General, testify before the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on Thursday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images