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Following the 2020 presidential election, then-Department of Justice official Jeffrey Clark promised to pursue baseless election fraud claims for then-President Donald Trump. Yuri Gripas/AP hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/AP

The Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol raised alarm bells for a think tank studying democracy. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Democracy is declining in the U.S. but it's not all bad news, a report finds

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters ahead of House passage of Democrats' Build Back Better Act, which now faces changes in the Senate. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in a case from Mississippi that could reverse the court's nearly half-century-old Roe v. Wade decision. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court considers whether to reverse Roe v. Wade

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Some Republican lawmakers in Wisconsin want to take away a bipartisan elections agency's control over voting and give it to the Republican-controlled Legislature. The Wisconsin state Capitol in Madison is shown in 2017. Scott Bauer/AP hide caption

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Scott Bauer/AP

There's a GOP push in Wisconsin to take over the state's election system

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Former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows at the U.S. Capitol in February. Meadows has agreed to provide documents and appear for a deposition before the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Ex-Trump Chief of Staff Mark Meadows will appear before the Jan. 6 panel

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Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., (right), speaks to Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., and Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, following an April 29 news conference on the Military Justice Improvement and Increasing Prevention Act. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Dr. Mehmet Oz, seen here in a December 2019 file photo, joins the Republican field of possible candidates aiming to capture Pennsylvania's open U.S. Senate seat in next year's election. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Anthony Fauci (right), director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical adviser to the president, speaks alongside President Biden following a meeting of the COVID-19 response team at the White House on Monday. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

The U.S. Capitol dome is seen as traffic fills North Capitol St. on Nov. 23, 2021. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Congress returns to try to avoid a partial government shutdown. Here's its to-do list

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Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., leader of a group of centrist Democrats, backed the domestic spending bill that the House approved last week but says internal fights complicated the effort to get the message out on the measure's components. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Democrats go on the offense with Biden's agenda to avoid a repeat of Obamacare battle

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The future of abortion, always a contentious issue, is up at the Supreme Court on Dec. 1. Arguments are planned challenging Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the court's major decisions over the last half-century that guarantee a woman's right to an abortion nationwide. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

As the Supreme Court considers Roe v. Wade, a look at how abortion became legal

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President Biden speaks to media as he arrives on Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., on Sunday after returning from Nantucket, Mass., after spending the Thanksgiving holiday there. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Republicans often present a united front, but loyalty to former President Donald Trump, seen here with House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy, and views about his future in the party are showing some divisions. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Shalanda Young testifies during a hearing in March to examine her nomination to be deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget. She has been serving as acting director for the past eight months and will stay on as director if the Senate confirms her nomination. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP