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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Judge Orders Trump Administration To Remove 2020 Census Citizenship Question

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Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, a member of the House Judiciary Committee, is under fire again for making controversial remarks. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House GOP Leaders Move To Strip Rep. Steve King Of Committee Assignments

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Unauthorized immigrants leave a court in shackles in McAllen, Texas. More than 40,000 immigration court hearings have been canceled since the government shut down. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Attorney general nominee William Barr met with senators including Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, last week. Barr has vowed to preserve special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

President Trump called the idea he might have worked on behalf of Russia a "hoax" at the White House on Monday. "A whole big fat hoax." News reports raised new questions over the weekend. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump, Following Explosive News Reports, Denies He Worked For Russia

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Then-Attorney General William Barr, left, with President George H.W. Bush. Barr supported Bush's pardons for six people caught up in the Iran-Contra scandal, which is resonating today. Marcy Nighswander/AP hide caption

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Marcy Nighswander/AP

William Barr Supported Pardons In An Earlier D.C. 'Witch Hunt': Iran-Contra

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Federal workers wait for food distribution to begin on Saturday at a pop-up food bank in Rockville, Md. The Capital Area Food Bank is distributing free food to government employees during the government shutdown. Ian Stewart/NPR hide caption

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Ian Stewart/NPR

As Shutdown Continues, Thousands Of Federal Workers Visit D.C.-Area Pop-Up Food Banks

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Demonstrators outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in 2014 react to hearing the court's decision on the Hobby Lobby birth control case. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Union members and other federal employees protest in front of the White House on Thursday. Many are out of work as the partial government shutdown has dragged on longer than any in history. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich gestures toward President Bill Clinton, as then-Senate GOP leader Bob Dole sits to the right. They met to try to work through the government shutdown in late 1995 to early 1996. Greg Gibson/AP hide caption

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Greg Gibson/AP

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IRS employee Pam Crosbie and others hold signs protesting the government shutdown at a federal building in Ogden, Utah. Natalie Behring/Getty Images hide caption

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Natalie Behring/Getty Images

A section of the reinforced U.S.-Mexico border fence as seen from Tijuana, Mexico, on Sunday. Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images

Once A Fence, Later Slats, Almost Always A Wall: Trump's Border Wall Contradictions

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President Trump holds a picture labeled "typical standard wall design" as he hosts a roundtable discussion on border security in the Cabinet Room of the White House on Friday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

North Carolina 9th district Republican congressional candidate Mark Harris, with his wife Beth, claims victory in his congressional race in Monroe, N.C. The race, however, has yet to be certified as authorities look into fraud claims in the eastern part of the district. Nell Redmond/AP hide caption

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Nell Redmond/AP

'Whatever It Took': Republican Mark Harris' Path To The Election That Won't End

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