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Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., said Thursday that she would "move forward" with Senate Democrats' spending bill to tackle climate change, health care and tax reforms. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supporters of a constitutional amendment about abortion in Kansas remove signs ahead of Tuesday's vote. Kyle Rivas/Getty Images hide caption

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Kyle Rivas/Getty Images

President Barack Obama delivers a televised statement that Osama bin Laden was killed in 2011. President Donald Trump makes a statement announcing the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in 2019. President Biden announces on Monday that a U.S. drone strike in Afghanistan killed al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri. Brendan Smialowski/Pool; Alex Wong; Jim Watson/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Pool; Alex Wong; Jim Watson/Pool/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Thursday that the Senate would vote to move forward on the Inflation Reduction Act, the Democrats' package that tackles climate change, prescription drugs and inflation, this weekend. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Migrants from Venezuela, who boarded a bus in Del Rio, Texas, disembark within view of the US Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

GOP governors sent buses of migrants to D.C. and NYC — with no plan for what's next

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Arizona Republican candidate for governor Kari Lake speaks at an election-night gathering in Scottsdale, Ariz., on Tuesday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President Biden started his presidency only selectively referring to his predecessor as "the former guy." But he's talking about Donald Trump frequently in recent weeks and months. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Biden used to keep Trump mentions to a minimum. Not anymore

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Alie Utley and Joe Moyer react to their county voting against the proposed constitutional amendment during the Kansas for Constitutional Freedom primary election watch party in Overland Park, Kan., on Tuesday. Dave Kaup/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Kaup/AFP via Getty Images

How the 2022 midterms strategy could change after the Kansas abortion vote

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A mural of Rep. John Lewis on a street named after him Feb. 11, in Nashville, Tenn. The late Lewis was part of a movement that marched downtown from the historically Black neighborhood of North Nashville to take part in lunch counter sit-ins. That same neighborhood is redistricted into a mostly white congressional district, which some Democrats are comparing past civil rights violations. John Amis/AP hide caption

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John Amis/AP

A video showing Alex Jones is shown as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing on July 12. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán told the crowd at the CPAC conference in Dallas on Thursday that they were fighting a "culture war." Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Hungary's autocratic leader tells U.S. conservatives to join his culture war

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Federal judge Dabney Friedrich castigated Capitol riot defendant Brandon Straka for making, in her view, "questionable" comments about his case in public since his sentencing. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

White House National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Biden's national security adviser doubles down on Taiwan policy after Pelosi visit

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Abortion-rights supporters cheer as the proposed Kansas constitutional amendment that would allow abortion restrictions in the state fails. They were watching election results at the Kansas for Constitutional Freedom watch party in Overland Park. Dave Kaup/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Kaup/AFP via Getty Images

Justice Samuel Alito, seen here in 2007, has emerged as the workhorse of the Supreme Court's conservatives and has spent his time on the court forcefully shaping its opinions. Nancy Ostertag/Getty Images hide caption

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Nancy Ostertag/Getty Images

Samuel Alito, a workhorse on the Supreme Court, shapes its conservative path

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Mark Finchem, a Republican candidate for Arizona secretary of state, waves to the crowd as he arrives to speak at a rally put on by former President Donald Trump in Arizona on July 22. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Blake Masters won the Arizona GOP Senate primary Tuesday night, and will face Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly in November in a race that could determine control of the Senate. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Sen. Joe Manchin, Democrat of West Virginia, speaks to reporters about the compromise bill that could substantially alter a tax provision called the "carried interest loophole." Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Blake Masters, a Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate in Arizona, speaks to supporters during a campaign event in Tucson. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Talk of 'invasion' moves from the fringe to the mainstream of GOP immigration message

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Kansas state Rep. Stephanie Clayton, an abortion rights supporter who was a Republican and is now a Democrat, reacts as a referendum to strip abortion rights out of the state constitution fails. Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR hide caption

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Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR