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Pro-Trump protesters gather in front of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 in Washington, D.C. The mob stormed the Capitol, breaking windows and clashing with police officers. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

President Biden announced a mandate for federal workers to get vaccinated at the White House on Sept. 9. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Roger Stone, left, and Alex Jones hold a press conference before attending a House Judiciary Committee hearing in 2018. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Roger Stone, Alex Jones among new subpoenas issued by Jan. 6 panel

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has been selected for a second term at the helm of the Fed, a move likely to be welcomed by markets. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Biden reappoints Jerome Powell as Fed chairman at a critical time for the economy

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Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D-Va., is one of 70 House Democrats that Republicans are targeting to beat in November 2022. Here she greets voters outside the Orange County Registrar's office Sept. 18, 2020 in Orange, Va. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

As the GOP eyes Virginia swing district, is the Biden agenda enough for Democrats?

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Democratic Rep. Lucy McBath, from Georgia speaks as the House Judiciary Committee hears investigative findings in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, Monday, Dec. 9, 2019. When redrawing her district, Republicans in Georgia removed several Democrat-heavy precincts. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

As Georgia grows more Democratic, its members of Congress will not

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President Biden walks to speak with reporters as he returns to the White House Friday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Democrats hope Biden's sales job can help their midterm chances

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Armed participants walk at a Proud Boys rally with other right-wing demonstrators in September 2020 in Portland, Ore. Far-right groups celebrated the verdict in the Rittenhouse trial. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

For far-right groups, Rittenhouse's acquittal is a cause for celebration

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks during a Friday news conference with other Democratic leaders after House passage of the Build Back Better Act. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

The House passes a $2 trillion spending bill, but braces for changes in the Senate

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy held the floor for more than eight hours overnight, denouncing the Democrats' social policy and climate change bill. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

President Biden pumps his fists after getting a medical checkup as he departs Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., onΓ‚ Friday. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

A supply ship sits anchored next to the Chevron Corp. Jack/St. Malo deepwater oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico in May 2018. The Biden administration is auctioning millions of acres of the Gulf for oil and gas lease sales. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., was censured by the House of Representatives and lost his committee assignments after posting a violent video on social media of a character with his image murdering a character with New York Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's image. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Gosar is censured over an anime video depicts him killing AOC

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Jacob Chansley, the self-styled "QAnon shaman," confronts U.S. Capitol Police officers during the Jan. 6 insurrection. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Self-styled 'QAnon shaman' is sentenced to 41 months in Capitol riot

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Democratic congressional candidate Rochelle Garza speaks with voters in Brownsville, Texas, in September. Many Latino voters in South Texas turned against Democrats during last year's presidential election β€” and winning them back could prove critical to the party's hopes of retaining control of Congress during next year's midterms. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

House Democrats have a new strategy to engage voters of color in the midterm elections

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Some doctors, medical associations and members of Congress are complaining that the rule released by the Biden administration this fall for implementing the law to stop surprise medical bills actually favors insurers and doesn't follow the spirit of the legislation. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images