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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky told NPR that he continues to support the Mueller investigation and that nothing he heard in a secret briefing Thursday changes his mind. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

McConnell Says He Supports Mueller Investigation

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A war of words has scuttled a June 12 summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, seen during a news broadcast Wednesday in Seoul. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Trump Cancels Summit With North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un

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Jack Johnson, seen here in New York City in 1932, was the first black world heavyweight champion. On Thursday, President Trump granted him a rare posthumous pardon, clearing his name more than a century after a racially charged conviction. AP hide caption

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AP

President Trump stands, with his hand over his heart, on the field for the national anthem before the start of the NCAA National Championship football game in January. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

President Trump's chief of staff, John Kelly, arrives for a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House on Monday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

WH: Kelly, Attorney Flood Didn't Stay For Secret Portions of Russia Briefings

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U.S. Postal Service mail vehicles sit in a parking lot at a mail distribution center on February 18, 2015 in San Francisco, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Deadly Delivery: Opioids By Mail

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President Trump arrives at a campaign rally in Elkhart, Ind., on May 10, where he tried to fire up support for GOP Senate candidate Mike Braun, who is challenging Democratic incumbent Sen. Joe Donnelly in a state Trump won easily in 2016. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump Is Sticking To His Playbook To Win The Midterms

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New cars and cargo containers are shown in a staging area, on April 6, 2018, at the Port of Tacoma in Wash. On Wednesday, President Donald Trump ordered the Commerce secretary to look into whether tariffs are needed on vehicles and auto parts imported to the U.S. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Under rules outlined in a newly unveiled Trump administration proposal, crisis pregnancy centers and other organizations that do not provide standard contraceptive options, like birth control pills or IUDs, could find it easier to apply for Title X funds. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Under Trump, Family Planning Funds Could Go To Groups That Oppose Contraception

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People wait in line to enter the U.S. Supreme Court last month. The court sided with businesses on not allowing class-action lawsuits for federal labor violations. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Supreme Court Decision Delivers Blow To Workers' Rights

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Supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump watch as Fox News projects him the winner in Florida on Nov. 8, 2016. Fox is joining the Associated Press in a new experiment to measure voter preferences, which will be key to their projections on election night in 2018. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Senatorial candidate, Don Blankenship, speaks during a town hall to kick off his GOP campaign in Logan, W.Va., on Jan. 18, 2018. After losing the Republican primary, Blankenship says he'll run under the Constitution Party banner. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Georgia Democratic nominee for governor Stacey Abrams takes the stage to declare victory Tuesday night. Abrams is the first black woman to win a major-party nomination for governor in U.S. history. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

A Veterans Affairs Department hospital in Denver. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Senate Passes $55 Billion Veterans Affairs Reform Bill

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Travis Brenda is a math teacher at Rockcastle County High School who ousted Jonathan Shell in a primary election Tuesday. Shell is a key member of the Republican leadership team that has orchestrated the teacher pension bill, the tax increases and the charter school bill. Wade Payne/AP hide caption

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Wade Payne/AP

President Trump speaks during the Susan B. Anthony List's 11th annual Campaign for Life Gala at the National Building Museum on Tuesday. President Trump addressed the annual gala of the anti-abortion group and urged people to vote in the midterm election. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Under legislation approved by the House on Tuesday, SunTrust and other banks with up to $250 billion in assets could be exempted from the toughest rules of the Dodd-Frank law. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Congress Rolls Back Part Of Dodd-Frank, Easing Rules For Midsize, Smaller Banks

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President Trump meets with South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Tuesday in the Oval Office of the White House. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Warns Summit With North Korea May Not Happen On Schedule

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