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Former President Barack Obama, pictured at a town hall in Berlin in April 2019, has released a statement on the death of George Floyd, who died in police custody in Minnesota. John MacDougall/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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John MacDougall/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump's Twitter page is displayed on a mobile phone. The social media company flagged one of his tweets about Minneapolis as "glorifying violence" and hid it from public view unless a user clicks on it. Olivier Morin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Morin/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, at Delaware Memorial Bridge Veterans Memorial Park earlier this month, spoke from his home in Delaware where he has been during the coronavirus pandemic. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump gives remarks Friday on China in the Rose Garden. Alongside him are trade adviser Peter Navarro, from left, national security adviser Robert O'Brien, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders signs autographs at a February campaign event with Latino supporters in Santa Ana, Calif. Some Democrats say the Biden campaign can learn from Sanders' outreach. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

An election worker in Dallas setting up a polling place ahead of the March 3 in Texas. Texas officials are resisting efforts to expand mail-in voting due to the pandemic and insisting that voters cast ballots in person in upcoming elections. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Texas Voters Are Caught In The Middle Of A Battle Over Mail-In Voting

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Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice President Pence, listens during a coronavirus briefing with health insurers at the White House on March 10. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Pence Chief Of Staff Owns Stocks That Could Conflict With Coronavirus Response

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A volunteer artist sets up a memorial May 20 in Brooklyn. Artists and volunteer organizers across New York City put up memorials throughout the five boroughs to honor those who died of COVID-19. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

A 2019 naturalization ceremony in Lowell, Mass. The pandemic has put such ceremonies on hold in an election year when many new citizens vote for the first time. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., speaks during a news conference outside the U.S. Capitol about lawsuit he and other Republican leaders filed against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and congressional officials in an effort to block the House of Representatives from using a proxy voting system to allow for remote voting during the coronavirus pandemic. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Since Russia's expansive influence operation during the 2016 election, Americans' usage of social media has only increased — and drastically so, as a result of the pandemic. Caroline Amenabar/NPR hide caption

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Caroline Amenabar/NPR

Social Media Usage Is At An All-Time High. That Could Mean A Nightmare For Democracy

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Attorney General William Barr, pictured at a press briefing in March, has voiced opposition to the latest surveillance legislation after backing an earlier version. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump, who uses Twitter as his primary form of communication, has long accused Facebook and Twitter of censoring conservative views. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Trump Threatens To Shut Down Social Media After Twitter Adds Warning To His Tweets

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Candidate Donald Trump makes a dramatic entrance on the first night of the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland. His campaign hopes to replicate the scale of that event to demonstrate a recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Trump's Threat To Move Convention Causes Overnight Scramble

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For the first time, Twitter has directed users to a fact check of a tweet by President Trump. Denis Charlet/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Denis Charlet/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter Places Fact-Checking Warning On Trump Tweet For 1st Time

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Health care workers protest hospital understaffing and insufficient personal protective equipment last week outside Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, Calif. Ronen Tivony/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Ronen Tivony/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Trump Team Killed Rule Designed To Protect Health Workers From Pandemic Like COVID-19

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