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Lab assistant Tammy Brown dons personal protective equipment in a lab at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. She works on preparing positive coronavirus tests for sequencing to discern variants rapidly spreading throughout the country. Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Atlanta election workers scan ballots and check for discrepancies earlier this year for Georgia U.S. Senate races. The state's controversial new voting law contains many changes for election officials. Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

Why Local Election Officials In Georgia Take Issue With Many Parts Of New Law

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Sydney Duncan holds a sign during a rally at the Alabama State House to draw attention to legislation introduced in Alabama that's aimed at restricting transgender people's access to medical care. Julie Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Julie Bennett/Getty Images

President Biden has sought to focus his administration's foreign policy on the challenges posed by China — a topic he is set to discuss with Japan's prime minister on Friday. Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images

Johnson & Johnson was mentioned roughly the same amount every hour online Tuesday as it was in entire weeks before news of the vaccine's pause, according to the tracking firm Zignal Labs. Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Most Popular J&J Vaccine Story On Facebook? A Conspiracy Theorist Posted It

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A city street is closed this month for repairs and upgrades in Orlando, Fla. As part of an infrastructure proposal by the Biden administration, $115 billion is earmarked to modernize bridges, highways and roads. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Democratic Rep. Hank Johnson (from left), Sen. Ed Markey, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler and Rep. Mondaire Jones announce legislation Thursday to expand the number of seats on the U.S. Supreme Court outside the high court. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Rep. Katie Porter, a Democrat from California, during a House Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in March 2020. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

What Is Infrastructure? It's A Gender Issue, For Starters

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Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting Wednesday via video link. The sanctions against Moscow signal that "we are going to be clear to Russia that there will be consequences when warranted," the White House press secretary says. Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik/Kremlin/Pool via AP hide caption

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Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik/Kremlin/Pool via AP

U.S. Slaps New Sanctions On Russia Over Cyberattack, Election Meddling

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A Capitol police officer looks out of a broken window as pro-Trump rioters storm into the building on Jan. 6. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitol Police Needs Help To Address Insurrection Failures, Inspector General Says

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Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Karen Gibson attends the service for slain U.S. Capitol Officer William "Billy" Evans, as his remains lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda on Tuesday. Tom Williams/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

New Senate Sergeant-At-Arms Wants To Keep Capitol Secure And Open To The Public

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Shawn Steffee is business agent at Boilermakers Local 154 in Pittsburgh, and worries a transition to clean energy could cost him pay and hurt his pension. Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front

Biden Says His Climate Plan Means Jobs. Some Union Members Are Skeptical

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Democratic Texas Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee is the lead sponsor of H.R. 40, a bill that would establish a commission to study reparations for slavery. Chip Somodevilla/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

House Lawmakers Advance Historic Bill To Form Reparations Commission

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A detailed review of the Jan. 6 insurrection by the U.S. Capitol Police's inspector general is set for discussion at a House hearing on Thursday. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

A Planned Parenthood of Utah facility in Salt Lake City. The Biden administration is moving to reverse a Trump-era family planning policy that critics describe as a domestic "gag rule" for reproductive healthcare providers. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Biden Administration Moves To Undo Trump Abortion Rules For Title X

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President Biden unveils a $2 trillion infrastructure plan in Pittsburgh on March 31. In his speech, Biden said the plan would help the U.S. compete with China. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

For Biden, China Rivalry Adds Urgency To Infrastructure Push

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Kristen Clarke delivers remarks after being nominated to be civil rights division assistant attorney general by then-President-elect Joe Biden on Jan. 7. Her confirmation hearing is on Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Kristen Clarke's Civil Rights Record Led Her To Barrier-Breaking DOJ Nomination

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended a pause in the use of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, shown here in a hospital in Denver. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie (center) visits Kabul, Afghanistan, in January 2020. The Biden administration said it plans to complete a drawdown of U.S. troops in the country by Sept. 11. Lolita Baldor/AP hide caption

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Lolita Baldor/AP