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Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep interviews Hakeem Jeffries at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 25, 2023. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Hakeem Jeffries says Democrats won't pay a 'ransom note' to GOP over debt ceiling

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U.S. second gentleman, Doug Emhoff, lays a wreath honoring Holocaust victims at the former Auschwitz site on Friday in Oswiecim, Poland. Omar Marques/Getty Images hide caption

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In this image taken from San Francisco Police Department body-camera video, Paul Pelosi (right) fights for control of a hammer with his assailant during a brutal attack on Oct. 28, 2022. San Francisco Police Department via AP hide caption

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San Francisco Police Department via AP

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., delivers remarks during a hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 21, 2022. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Adam Schiff announces 2024 Senate run, teeing up a high-profile primary

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New proposals by the Biden administration would change how the U.S. census and federal surveys ask Latinos about their race and ethnicity and add a checkbox for "Middle Eastern or North African" to those forms. RussellCreative/Getty Images hide caption

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RussellCreative/Getty Images

New 'Latino' and 'Middle Eastern or North African' checkboxes proposed for U.S. forms

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Suspending former President Donald Trump's account was the most high-profile and controversial content moderation decision Facebook parent Meta has ever made. Alon Skuy/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alon Skuy/AFP via Getty Images

Meta allows Donald Trump back on Facebook and Instagram

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Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., center, with Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., left, and Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

U.S. Abrams tanks participate in a live fire demonstration during training exercises in Poland in September 2022. President Biden announced Wednesday that the U.S. will be sending 31 Abrams tanks to Ukraine. Germany also said it will be sending tanks. Omar Marques/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Marques/Getty Images

Former Vice President Mike Pence, shown here last month in Rock Hill, S.C., stored a "small number" of documents bearing classified markings in his Indiana home after having been "inadvertently" boxed up. They have been collected by the FBI. Meg Kinnard/AP hide caption

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Meg Kinnard/AP

Penny Harrison and her son Parker Harrison rally outside the U.S. Capitol during the Senate Judiciary Committee's Ticketmaster hearing on Tuesday morning. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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The Senate's Ticketmaster hearing featured plenty of Taylor Swift puns and protesters

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In this May 2022 file photo, Fulton County Superior Court Judge Robert McBurney speaks during proceedings to seat a special purpose grand jury in Fulton County, Ga., to look into the actions of former President Donald Trump and his supporters who tried to overturn the results of the 2020 election. Ben Gray/AP hide caption

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Ben Gray/AP

A Georgia judge weighs release of a grand jury report into 2020 election interference

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Jeff Zients removes his mask in this file photo from April 13, 2021. President Biden has decided to choose his former COVID-19 response coordinator as his new chief of staff, replacing Ron Klain. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

A sign held up by a demonstrator says "MOORE V. HARPER: A WEAPON TO OVERTURN ELECTIONS" at a December rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

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Mariam Zuhaib/AP

The Supreme Court is weighing a theory that could upend elections. Here's how

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President Biden leaves Saint Edmond Catholic Church in Rehoboth Beach, Del., after attending Mass on Jan. 21. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The News Corp. building in New York City, home to Fox News. Kevin Hagen/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Hagen/Getty Images

Fox News' defense in defamation suit invokes debunked election-fraud claims

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Since the Dobbs decision in June, clinics providing abortions in what are now restrictive states have had to reinvent what they do. Shannon Brewer, pictured here in 2019 at the Jackson Women's Health Organization, now runs a clinic in Las Cruces, N.M., where abortion is legal. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

50 years after Roe v. Wade, many abortion providers are changing how they do business

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Abortion-rights protesters shout into the Senate chamber in the Indiana Capitol on July 25, 2022, about a month after Roe was overturned, in Indianapolis. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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For those on Capitol Hill who would threaten a default as a means to compel concessions on policy, the destructive power of default is what makes it makes attractive as a tactic. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, the day the court released a report on its investigation into a leaked draft opinion in May 2022. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters at the March for Life on Jan. 20, 2023, in Washington D.C. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

At the first March for Life post-Roe, anti-abortion activists say fight isn't over

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