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Soldiers of Poland, Britain, the United States and Romania take part in military exercises at the military training ground in Bemowo Piskie, Poland, on Nov. 18, 2021. Janek Skarzynski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Janek Skarzynski/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., chairperson of the House panel investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol insurrection, testifies before the House Rules Committee in December. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Arizona Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema was censured for siding with Senate Republicans to protect the filibuster, effectively dooming the passage of major voting rights legislation. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

In this Dec. 14, 2020, file photo, a voter fills out paperwork before casting a ballot the first day of early voting for the Senate runoff election in Atlanta. Ben Gray/AP hide caption

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Ben Gray/AP

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., walks to her office in the basement of the U.S. Capitol building on Wednesday. Her positions on the filibuster and other issues have drawn threats of a primary challenge in Arizona. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Sinema's filibuster stance only adds to the frustrations of Arizona progressives

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People attend the March for Life rally on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Friday. The march, in its 49th year, comes as a Supreme Court decision on abortion rights could unravel Roe v. Wade. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's fugitive operations team makes an arrest at a home in Paramount, Calif., on March 1, 2020. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

Biden's limits on ICE offered hope. But immigrant advocates say he's broken promises

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Children draw on top of a canceled check prop during a rally in favor of the child tax credit in front of the U.S. Capitol on Dec. 13, 2021, in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

In Georgia, Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis is weighing whether Donald Trump and others committed crimes by trying to pressure Georgia officials to overturn Joe Biden's presidential election victory. Ben Gray/AP hide caption

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Ben Gray/AP

District attorney in Georgia asks for a special grand jury for Trump election probe

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a news conference Tuesday on Capitol Hill following a Senate Democratic Caucus meeting on voting rights and the filibuster. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Schumer insists failed votes on voting rights and filibuster were right thing to do

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., told reporters she doesn't think new laws governing lawmakers' investments are needed, but if members want one she would go along with it. Eric Lee/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Lee/Pool/Getty Images

President Biden planned to talk about infrastructure on the anniversary of his inauguration. But first, he had to clean up some comments he had made about Russia and Ukraine. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A poll worker in Austin, Texas, stamps a voter's 2020 ballot before dropping it into a secure box. Ahead of the state's March primary, local election officials in Texas are starting to deal with the effects of the new GOP-backed voting law. Sergio Flores/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Why Texas election officials are rejecting hundreds of vote-by-mail applications

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U.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the end of the war in Afghanistan in the State Dining Room at the White House on August 31, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Pro-life activists participate in the 48th annual March for Life outside the U.S. Supreme Court January 29, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Activists look ahead to what could be the 'last anniversary' for Roe

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