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A-29 Super Tucano planes are on display during a handover from the NATO-led Resolute Support mission to the Afghan army at the military Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sept. 17, 2020. Rahmat Gul/AP File Photo hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP File Photo

From center left to right: Yolanda Renee King, Arndrea Waters King and Martin Luther King III, lead the annual D.C. Peace Walk: Change Happens with Good Hope and a Dream across the Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge for Dr. Martin Luther King Day in Washington, D.C. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

A newly released Census Bureau email written during former President Donald Trump's administration — when Wilbur Ross, shown at a 2020 congressional hearing in Washington, D.C., served as the commerce secretary overseeing the census — details how officials interfered with the national head count. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

President Biden acknowledged his administration's recent struggles Friday while speaking about the bipartisan infrastructure bill he signed into law last year. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Biden's bad week and the unreality of great expectations

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Republican House members objected to the certification of votes, allowed under the Electoral Count Act, from Nevada during a joint session of Congress on Jan. 6, 2021. It was rejected because a senator did not join in the objection. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Former U.S. Deputy Treasury Secretary Sarah Bloom Raskin, shown here before the opening ceremony of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation finance ministers meeting in Beijing in 2014 is one of the three nominees President Joe Biden announced for the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors on Friday. Andy Wong/AP file photo hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP file photo

Biden announces three more Federal Reserve nominees

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The Supreme Court's vote to invalidate the vaccine-or-test regulation was 6 to 3, along ideological lines. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Supreme Court blocks Biden's vaccine-or-test mandate for large private companies

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Stewart Rhodes, founder of the Oath Keepers, speaks during a 2017 rally outside the White House. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Oath Keepers leader arrested, charged with seditious conspiracy for Jan. 6 riot

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Then-candidate Joe Biden walks on stage to begin the first presidential debate in September 2020. The 2020 faceoffs may be the last of their kind. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Republicans threaten to skip traditional general election debates

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and other Republicans are attempting to reframe the "big lie" as an attack on voting rights legislation pushed by Democrats. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Internal GOP conflicts about 2020 election surface as party fights new voting bills

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Former President Donald Trump at a rally in Phoenix, Ariz., on July 24, 2021. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Pressed on his election lies, former President Trump cuts NPR interview short

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday. Senate Democrats are trying to advance voting rights legislation, which would require changing Senate rules to pass. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images