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Abortion rights demonstrators hold signs outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Friday. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
Tracy Lee for NPR

For doctors, abortion restrictions create an 'impossible choice' when providing care

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From left, Steven Engel, former assistant attorney general for the Office of Legal Counsel, Jeffrey Rosen, former acting attorney general, and Richard Donoghue, former acting deputy attorney General, testify before the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on Thursday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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A patient talks with a nurse at a traveling contraception clinic in Madagascar run by MSI Reproductive Choices, an organization that provides contraception and safe abortion services in 37 countries. The group condemned the overturn of Roe v. Wade and warned that the ruling could stymie abortion access overseas. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Last year, President Biden announced "Build Back Better World," meant to compete with China's Belt and Road Initiative. This year at the G-7, Biden will unveil the first projects. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Volunteers take part in a 2004 voter outreach event in Dearborn, Mich., organized by the Arab American Institute. While there is no federal requirement for Arabic-language ballots, the city of Dearborn recently started requiring election materials to be translated into Arabic. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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A video displays a discussion about presidential pardons on Thursday during the fifth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Donoghue, former acting deputy attorney general, testifies Thursday before the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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An illlustration of a meeting at the Oval Office of the White House appears onscreen during a hearing by the House select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol attack in Washington on Thursday. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court strikes down N.Y. law that restricts concealed carrying of guns

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In this Sept. 14, 2020, file photo, Jeff Clark, then-Assistant Attorney General for the Environment and Natural Resources Division, speaks during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson (C) presides over the fifth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the Capitol on Thursday. Doug Mills/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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An image of former President Donald Trump is displayed during the third hearing of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 16. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks at the White House on April 27. The Biden administration proposed a dramatic rewrite of campus sexual assault rules on Thursday, moving to expand protections for LGBTQ students, bolster the rights of victims and widen colleges' responsibilities in addressing sexual misconduct. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Video showing an interview of former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen is played during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building on June 13, 2022, in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. Capitol Dome is pictured in Washington on Tuesday, the day Senate negotiators reached a bipartisan agreement on a gun safety bill. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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The Senate gun bill would close the 'boyfriend loophole.' Here's what that means

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President Biden pitched a three-month break on the federal fuel tax to help American drivers face the highest inflation in four decades, but critics said the proposal is unlikely to work. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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