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Prosecutor Andrew Weissmann talked with reporters outside the federal courthouse in Houston in 2002. His new book reflects on the past and potential future of the Justice Department. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Pat Sullivan/AP

The stage for the final presidential debate of the 2020 election is tested for light and sound at Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn., on Wednesday. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Oct. 14. On Thursday, the committee voted to advance her nomination to the full Senate for a confirmation vote. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AP

An election worker uses an electronic pollbook to check voters at a polling station in the Echo Park Recreation Complex in Los Angeles on March 3, 2020. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Voter Websites In California And Florida Could Be Vulnerable To Hacks, Report Finds

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Far-right extremist "Boogaloo boys" stand on the steps of the capitol in Lansing, Mich., during a rally on Oct. 17. Michigan is one of five states with the highest risk of increased militia activity around the elections, according to a new report. Seth Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Herald/Getty Images

Here's Where The Threat Of Militia Activity Around The Elections Is The Highest

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Foreign aid takes many forms — and Trump and Biden have differing perspectives. Above: Members of the Honduran Armed Forces carry a box of COVID-19 diagnostic testing kits donated by the United States Agency for International Development and the International Organization for Migration. Orlando Sierra/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP via Getty Images

Wind turbines near Dwight, Ill. and a pump jack in Cotulla, Texas. The presidential candidates have opposing views on the future of U.S. energy. Scott Olson and Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson and Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe, seen above during his earlier tenure in the House, delivered a briefing on election threats on Wednesday evening. Gabriella Demczuk/AP hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/AP

Supporters of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden sit atop their vehicles as they listen to him speak Sunday at Riverside High School in Durham, N.C. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Anxious Democrats Don't Trust Biden's Lead. His Campaign Is Fine With That

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Steve Wynn speaks to reporters in Massachusetts in 2016, when he still led Wynn Resorts. In 2018, Wynn stepped down from the company after a series of allegations of sexual misconduct, including one allegation of rape. Wynn has denied any wrongdoing. Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

A poll worker places vote-by mail ballots into a ballot box this month at the Miami-Dade County Election Department headquarters in Doral, Fla. Voters in Florida are among those who have reported receiving emails threatening them to vote for President Trump. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images