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Future President George Washington is depicted at the U.S. Constitutional Convention. The country's founders foresaw the threat of foreign interference in our elections. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke hopes that his face-to-face approach and grassroots fundraising will set him apart from the other Democratic presidential contenders. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Beto O'Rourke Calls For A 'Moonshot' To Combat Climate Change

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Rep. James Clyburn will host a fish fry, a mainstay of South Carolina politics for nearly 30 years, on June 21. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Why 2020 Democrats Are Lining Up For Clyburn's 'World Famous' Fish Fry

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Sarah Huckabee Sanders talks to reporters outside the White House on April 29. President Trump said she would leave her job as press secretary at the end of June. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Press Secretary Sarah Sanders To Leave The White House

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Former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Kamala Harris, former Rep. Beto O'Rourke have all made the cut to appear in the first Democratic primary debate. Scott Eisen; Mark Makela; Ethan Miller; Kimberly White; Kimberly White/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen; Mark Makela; Ethan Miller; Kimberly White; Kimberly White/Getty Images

Kellyanne Conway, counselor to President Trump, talks to reporters outside the White House on May 1. The Office of Special Counsel says Conway should "be removed from federal service" for repeated violations of the Hatch Act. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump speaks with reporters at the White House on Tuesday. He told ABC News that he would be open to hearing information about rival presidential candidates from a foreign government. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

FACT CHECK: Foreign Interference And 'Opposition Research' Are Not The Same

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Presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden publicly switched his position on the Hyde Amendment under pressure from other Democrats. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Ban On Abortion Funding Stays In House Bill As 2020 Democrats Promise Repeal

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President Trump, pictured in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on June 12, spoke with ABC News about whether he would accept damaging information about a 2020 rival from another government. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A participant in a 2018 naturalization ceremony holds a U.S. flag in New York City. Research by the Census Bureau suggests the citizenship question is highly likely to scare households with noncitizens from taking part in the constitutionally mandated head count. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

TV personality Jon Stewart at a hearing by the House Judiciary Committee as it considers permanent authorization of the Victim Compensation Fund on Capitol Hill in Washington. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

ACLU's Voting Rights Project Director Dale Ho (center) speaks outside the U.S. Supreme Court in April after arguing on behalf of plaintiffs in the lawsuits over the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Citizenship Question Lawsuit Plaintiffs Ask Supreme Court To Delay Ruling

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Democratic presidential candidate and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., spoke to the NPR Politics Podcast about abortion access, the economy and trade, on Sunday in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Oversight committee Chairman Elijah Cummings can now, with the assent of the House leadership, file suit and ask a judge to order William Barr and Wilbur Ross to provide the census materials he wants. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Alexis Rivero of Cuba's Los Leñeros de Las Tunas pitches during a Caribbean Series match against Venezuela's Cardenales de Lara in Panama City on Feb. 6. Major League Baseball had made a deal with Cuba's baseball federation to allow Cuban athletes to play in the U.S. without defecting, only to see the Trump administration subsequently block the rule. Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Will Play Ball With MLB On Cuban Players If League Helps With Venezuela

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Rep. Joe Cunningham, D-S.C., pictured in January, opposes a plan to increase lawmakers' salaries, saying that's not what his constituents sent him to Washington to do. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

The House, led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., voted to authorize lawsuits in pursuit of materials related to the special counsel's Russia investigation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren participates in a re-enacted swearing-in with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 3, 2013. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Democratic Presidential Debates Could Reignite Warren-Biden Bankruptcy Fight

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