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People wait in line on the first day of early voting for the 2020 general election on Oct. 12 in Atlanta. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Why Republicans Are Moving To Fix Elections That Weren't Broken

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Lawmakers and journalists are among those calling for penalties against Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman for the 2018 killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi after a U.S. intelligence report finding the crown prince had approved the operation. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP

A Capitol Police officer holds a program as people pay their respects at the remains officer Brian Sicknick, who died after defending the Capitol against the Jan. 6 insurrection. Demetrius Freeman/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Demetrius Freeman/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Congressional Democrats have included some of their longtime legislative priorities in the $1.9 trillion COVID relief package. Republicans accuse it of being an expensive liberal wish list; Democrats say they want a New Deal for the present era. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Senate parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough works beside then-Vice President Mike Pence earlier this year during the certification of 2020 Electoral College ballots, in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Voters fill out 2020 general election ballots in Alexandria, Va. A state-level Voting Rights Act is now on the governor's desk. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Virginia Is Poised To Approve Its Own Voting Rights Act

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Former Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga., waits for Vice President Mike Pence to arrive for her swearing-in reenactment for the cameras in the Capitol in January 2020. Bill Clark/Getty Images hide caption

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President Biden and first lady Jill Biden step off Air Force One at Ellington Field Joint Reserve Base in Houston, where he is scheduled to speak Friday night at a vaccination site at NRG Stadium. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images
LA Johnson/NPR

With One Move, Congress Could Lift Millions Of Children Out Of Poverty

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Activists are likely to be disappointed that the Senate parliamentarian ruled against the inclusion of a $15 minimum wage in the giant COVID relief bill. But the provision's omission likely means the measure will gain more support in the Senate. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate Can't Vote On $15 Minimum Wage, Parliamentarian Rules

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Then-President Donald Trump waves at the crowd during the 2020 Conservative Political Action Conference. This year, Trump is out of office but is still headlining the event. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

It's All About Trump: CPAC Seems Poised To Ignore Republican Identity Crisis

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Signs sit near the White House following a 2018 March for Our Lives rally. Three years later, the activist group, founded by survivors of the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, is consulting with the Biden administration on violence prevention policies. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Youth Activists Are Heard In Biden's White House, But They Want To See More Action

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The Biden administration has reopened shelters for migrant teens that were first used by the Trump administration in Carrizo Springs, Texas. Long trailers that previously housed oil workers in two-bedroom suites were turned into dorms with bunk beds, classrooms and medical care. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Biden Pledges That Border Shelter For Teens 'Won't Stay Open Very Long'

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, seen here in July, denies allegations that he sexually harassed former adviser Lindsey Boylan. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Getty Images