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Vanita Gupta appears during her confirmation hearing last month before the Senate Judiciary Committee. The Senate voted to confirm Gupta as associate attorney general in a 51-49 vote. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks alongside members of the Congressional Black Caucus on Tuesday following the verdict against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Attorney General Merrick Garland announces a Justice Department probe of possible patterns of excessive force and discrimination by the Minneapolis Police Department on Wednesday. Andrew Harnik/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

DOJ To Investigate Minneapolis Police Over Possible Patterns Of Excessive Force

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Electric vehicles at a charging station last year in San Mateo, Calif. The governors of 12 states, including California, have called on President Biden to order that all cars and light trucks sold in the U.S. after 2035 be zero-emission vehicles. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Biden appears Wednesday at the White House, where he announced his administration has reached a goal of 200 million COVID-19 shots within his first 100 days in office. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and the chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., are proposing free college tuition for those from families earning up to $125,000 per year. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Biden delivers remarks Tuesday on the guilty verdict against former police officer Derek Chauvin, as Vice President Harris looks on. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is taken into custody as his attorney, Eric Nelson, looks on after the verdicts were read on Tuesday at Chauvin's trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd. Court TV/AP hide caption

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Court TV/AP

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, here during a news conference Thursday, brought a motion to censure Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., over comments she made at a protest last weekend. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Biden appears in the Oval Office on Tuesday, where in brief remarks to the press he said he was praying that the verdict in the George Floyd case "is the right verdict." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Biden meets with members of the Congressional Black Caucus in the Oval Office of the White House on April 13. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Looming Chauvin Verdict Will Test Biden's Leadership On Race

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Sulma Franco, an organizer with Mujeres Luchadoras and Grassroots Leadership and an LGBT activist from Guatemala, leads protesters on March 24 to the entrance of the T. Don Hutto Residential Center in Taylor, Texas, where U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement contracts for the detention of migrant women. Julia Robinson hide caption

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Julia Robinson

Immigrant Detention For Profit Faces Resistance After Big Expansion Under Trump

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (right) speaks outside the U.S. Capitol in March with other members of the U.S. House of Representatives, the size of which has stayed at 435 voting members for decades. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Stuck At 435 Representatives? Why The U.S. House Hasn't Grown With Census Counts

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Former Vice President Walter Mondale and former President Jimmy Carter appeared together in 2018, marking Mondale's 90th birthday. Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

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Star Tribune via Getty Images

Former Vice President Walter Mondale Dies At 93

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Proud Boy members Joseph Biggs (left) and Ethan Nordean, carrying a megaphone, walk toward the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. A federal judge ordered them detained pending trial given the conspiracy charges against them. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

A U.S. Capitol Police officer holds a program during a Feb. 3 ceremony honoring Brian Sicknick in the Capitol Rotunda. A medical examiner determined that Sicknick died of natural causes following the Jan. 6 insurrection. Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

"We've got to get more confrontational, we've got to make sure that they know we mean business," Rep. Maxine Waters said during a protest at the Brooklyn Center Police Department on Saturday. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, says her immigrant journey, detailed in a new memoir, has driven her to "stand up to bullies." Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images

Quiet No More: Sen. Hirono's Immigrant Journey Fuels Her Fire In Congress

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President Biden promotes his American Jobs Plan during an appearance in the South Court Auditorium on the White House campus on April 7. The sheer scale of his early agenda has drawn comparisons to the achievements of FDR and LBJ. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP