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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, here during a news conference Thursday, brought a motion to censure Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., over comments she made at a protest last weekend. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Biden appears in the Oval Office on Tuesday, where in brief remarks to the press he said he was praying that the verdict in the George Floyd case "is the right verdict." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Biden meets with members of the Congressional Black Caucus in the Oval Office of the White House on April 13. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Looming Chauvin Verdict Will Test Biden's Leadership On Race

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Sulma Franco, an organizer with Mujeres Luchadoras and Grassroots Leadership and an LGBT activist from Guatemala, leads protesters on March 24 to the entrance of the T. Don Hutto Residential Center in Taylor, Texas, where U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement contracts for the detention of migrant women. Julia Robinson hide caption

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Julia Robinson

Immigrant Detention For Profit Faces Resistance After Big Expansion Under Trump

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (right) speaks outside the U.S. Capitol in March with other members of the U.S. House of Representatives, the size of which has stayed at 435 voting members for decades. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Stuck At 435 Representatives? Why The U.S. House Hasn't Grown With Census Counts

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Former Vice President Walter Mondale and former President Jimmy Carter appeared together in 2018, marking Mondale's 90th birthday. Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

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Star Tribune via Getty Images

Former Vice President Walter Mondale Dies At 93

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Proud Boy members Joseph Biggs (left) and Ethan Nordean, carrying a megaphone, walk toward the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. A federal judge ordered them detained pending trial given the conspiracy charges against them. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

A U.S. Capitol Police officer holds a program during a Feb. 3 ceremony honoring Brian Sicknick in the Capitol Rotunda. A medical examiner determined that Sicknick died of natural causes following the Jan. 6 insurrection. Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

"We've got to get more confrontational, we've got to make sure that they know we mean business," Rep. Maxine Waters said during a protest at the Brooklyn Center Police Department on Saturday. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, says her immigrant journey, detailed in a new memoir, has driven her to "stand up to bullies." Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images

Quiet No More: Sen. Hirono's Immigrant Journey Fuels Her Fire In Congress

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President Biden promotes his American Jobs Plan during an appearance in the South Court Auditorium on the White House campus on April 7. The sheer scale of his early agenda has drawn comparisons to the achievements of FDR and LBJ. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Reps. Ilhan Omar (from left), Rashida Tlaib and Ayanna Pressley, seen here at a news conference last month outside the U.S. Capitol, are among those calling on the Biden administration to lift the cap on refugees. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Lab assistant Tammy Brown dons personal protective equipment in a lab at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. She works on preparing positive coronavirus tests for sequencing to discern variants rapidly spreading throughout the country. Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Atlanta election workers scan ballots and check for discrepancies earlier this year for Georgia U.S. Senate races. The state's controversial new voting law contains many changes for election officials. Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

Why Local Election Officials In Georgia Take Issue With Many Parts Of New Law

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Sydney Duncan holds a sign during a rally at the Alabama State House to draw attention to legislation introduced in Alabama that's aimed at restricting transgender people's access to medical care. Julie Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Julie Bennett/Getty Images

President Biden has sought to focus his administration's foreign policy on the challenges posed by China — a topic he is set to discuss with Japan's prime minister on Friday. Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images

Johnson & Johnson was mentioned roughly the same amount every hour online Tuesday as it was in entire weeks before news of the vaccine's pause, according to the tracking firm Zignal Labs. Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Most Popular J&J Vaccine Story On Facebook? A Conspiracy Theorist Posted It

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A city street is closed this month for repairs and upgrades in Orlando, Fla. As part of an infrastructure proposal by the Biden administration, $115 billion is earmarked to modernize bridges, highways and roads. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Democratic Rep. Hank Johnson (from left), Sen. Ed Markey, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler and Rep. Mondaire Jones announce legislation Thursday to expand the number of seats on the U.S. Supreme Court outside the high court. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP