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President Biden unveils a $2 trillion infrastructure plan in Pittsburgh on March 31. In his speech, Biden said the plan would help the U.S. compete with China. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Kristen Clarke delivers remarks after being nominated to be civil rights division assistant attorney general by then-President-elect Joe Biden on Jan. 7. Her confirmation hearing is on Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Kristen Clarke's Civil Rights Record Led Her To Barrier-Breaking DOJ Nomination

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended a pause in the use of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, shown here in a hospital in Denver. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie (center) visits Kabul, Afghanistan, in January 2020. The Biden administration said it plans to complete a drawdown of U.S. troops in the country by Sept. 11. Lolita Baldor/AP hide caption

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Lolita Baldor/AP

If confirmed by the Senate, Robert Santos, a Latinx statistician shown here in a 2019 photo, would be the Census Bureau's first permanent director of color. Errich Petersen hide caption

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Errich Petersen

People arrive to drop off mail-in ballots or vote in person at an early voting location in Phoenix on Oct. 16, 2020. Republicans in Arizona are weighing measures to make the state's voting rules more restrictive. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Hawaii Democratic Sen. Mazie Hirono speaks during a press conference on the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act at the Capitol on Tuesday. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., here in 2017, is pushing his party to focus on working-class voters as a way to win back the House of Representatives in the 2022 midterms and the White House in 2024. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Top Republicans Work To Rebrand GOP As Party Of Working Class

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Christine Wormuth, pictured testifying on Capitol Hill in March 2015 during her tenure as defense undersecretary for policy, is President Biden's pick for secretary of the Army. Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

A healthcare worker displays a COVID-19 vaccine record card at the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center in December. Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Poll Finds Republicans Particularly Opposed To 'Vaccine Passport' Messaging

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Democrats such as Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and Sen. Patty Murray of Washington state are betting that the era of big government is back. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

African Methodist Episcopal Church Bishop Reginald Jackson announces a boycott of Coca-Cola products outside the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta on March 25 because he said Coca-Cola and other large Georgia companies hadn't done enough to oppose restrictive voting bills. Coca-Cola spoke out against a voting bill after it was signed into law. Jeff Amy/AP hide caption

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Jeff Amy/AP

President Biden holds a semiconductor during remarks before signing an executive order on the economy at the White House on Feb. 24. On Monday, senior members of his team met with leaders across various industries to discuss a shortage of semiconductors. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

White House Convenes Summit To Address Supply Shortage Crippling Auto Plants

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John Boehner, pictured in 2016, was speaker of the House during the Obama presidency. He says he sometimes went along with things he personally opposed because it was what members of his party wanted. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

John Boehner On The 'Noisemakers' Of The Republican Party

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As the first Black woman to ever serve as chief economist at the Labor Department, Janelle Jones is one of the Biden administration officials facing the task of addressing historic economic disparities that have only intensified during the pandemic. Janelle Jones hide caption

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Janelle Jones

This Top Biden Economist Has A Plan: Create Jobs, Address Inequality, Ignore Trolls

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A driver uses a fast-charging station for electric vehicles at New York's John F. Kennedy Airport on April 2. As part of President Biden's $2 trillion infrastructure plan, $174 billion would go to supporting the production of electric vehicles in the U.S. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Colorado state Rep. Tom Sullivan, pictured here in 2019 introducing former Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg, says now is not the time to push for a statewide ban on assault-style weapons. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Colorado Assault-Style Weapons Ban Doesn't Look Likely

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President Biden looks on after speaking during an event about gun violence prevention in the Rose Garden of the White House on April 8. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images