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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., seen here talking to reporters on Thursday, has called for bipartisan support for the House vote on the Senate-amended coronavirus relief legislation. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Deputy Attorney General nominee Lisa Monaco speaks during an event with then-President-elect Joe Biden in Wilmington, Del., on Jan. 7. Her confirmation hearing is on Tuesday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

President Biden and Vice President Harris invited 10 labor leaders into the Oval Office in mid-February. Biden has pledged to be the most labor-friendly president ever. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Faces 'Balancing Act' Advancing Clean Energy Alongside Labor Allies

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Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts broke with his colleagues on the court, filing a solo dissent for the first time in his nearly 16 years on the bench. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

On Sunday, New York state Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins called on Gov. Andrew Cuomo to resign amid sexual harassment allegations from multiple women. Office of the New York Governor via AP hide caption

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Office of the New York Governor via AP

President Biden speaks from the State Dining Room of the White House on Saturday, following the Senate's passage of his COVID-19 relief package by a 50-49 vote. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to the press Saturday at the Capitol, after the Senate passed COVID-19 relief legislation on a party-line vote. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Facebook has promised repeatedly in recent years to address the spread of conspiracy theories and misinformation on its site. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

Far-Right Misinformation Is Thriving On Facebook. A New Study Shows Just How Much

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Trump supporters clash with police outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Social media companies are under scrutiny for allowing their platforms to be used to spread falsehoods about the 2020 election and to allow violent extremist groups to organize January's insurrection. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Trump Is No Longer Tweeting, But Online Disinformation Isn't Going Away

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House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., says he hopes a wave of Democratic legislation will see "the light of day" in the Senate, but the divide in that chamber is a big hurdle. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Vice President Harris leaves the Capitol on Thursday after casting a procedural vote to start debate on the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Former Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao used her agency's resources to assist in personal errands and to help her family, according to an Office of Inspector General report. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images