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Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan was cleared by the Pentagon's Inspector General of allegations of ethics violations. Shanahan is seen here testifying at a House Armed Services Committee hearing last month. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., answers questions during a presidential forum held by She The People in Houston on Wednesday. Michael Wyke/AP hide caption

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Michael Wyke/AP

Democratic Candidates Pressed On Priorities By Women Of Color

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Iowa state Rep. Andy McKean, the longest-serving Republican in the Legislature, confirms his switch from the Republican to Democratic Party. Katarina Sostaric/Iowa Public Radio News hide caption

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Katarina Sostaric/Iowa Public Radio News

The Supreme Court justices are hearing oral arguments Tuesday over the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to forms for the 2020 census. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Supreme Court Appears To Lean Toward Allowing Census Citizenship Question

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Former Vice President Joe Biden leaves after addressing striking workers at the Stop & Shop in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston on April 18. He is expected to launch a presidential campaign within days. Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Democrats Consider: Is A White, Straight Man The Safe Bet Against Trump?

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Justice Department veteran Zachary Terwilliger is the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia and may end up prosecuting the WikiLeaks case. Justice Department via AP hide caption

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Justice Department via AP

Key U.S. Attorney, Swept Into Russia Investigation, May Prosecute WikiLeaks Case

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President Trump has accepted an invitation for a state visit from Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, setting up a trip in early June. The two are seen here during Trump's visit to the U.K. last June. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A sign directs voters to a polling station on Nov. 8, 2016, in Cave Creek, Arizona. The state is one of several considering new voting laws that could make it more complicated to vote in 2020. Ralph Freso/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralph Freso/Getty Images

2020 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks to local residents in Queens, N.Y. Warren wants the federal government to forgive hundreds of billions of dollars in existing student loan debt. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

The U.S. Supreme Court will take up three cases that hinge on federal discrimination laws and whether they protect LGBTQ workers when its new term begins in October. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Won't Renew Sanction Exemptions For Countries Buying Iran's Oil

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When the Mueller report was released, Ronnie Hipshire was surprised to find a photo of his father Lee on a poster to support President Trump that was created by Russians. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR

Inside The Mueller Report, This Man Saw A Photo Of His Dad Being Used By Russians

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Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski (left), former deputy national security adviser designate Kathleen Troia "K.T." McFarland and former White House counsel Don McGahn were named in Robert Mueller's report as people who did not carry out President Trump's asks. Tasos Katopodis; Chris Kleponis/AFP; Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis; Chris Kleponis/AFP; Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler has said, "This committee requires the full report and the underlying materials because it is our job — not the attorney general's — to determine whether or not President Trump has abused his office." Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Voting booths at a polling station in Christmas, Fla., on Election Day 2016. A Florida-based company that provides election equipment to localities was hacked by Russia during the 2016 election, the Mueller report found. Gregg Newton/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gregg Newton/AFP/Getty Images

In addition to investigating Russian attacks on the 2016 presidential election, special counsel Robert Mueller also was tasked with looking into "any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation." Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images