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In August of 2021, more than 1,000 janitors with the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) rallied and marched in Los Angeles, California ahead of their as their contracts expiring. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Was 2021 labor's year? Plus, 'Like a Virgin'

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Adele's fourth studio album 30 finds the singer reflecting on her divorce. Columbia Records hide caption

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Columbia Records

A view of a Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man figurine at the GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE World Premiere on November 15, 2021. Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Sony Pictures hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Sony Pictures

Presenting 'Pop Culture Happy Hour': is 'Ghostbusters: Afterlife' stuck in nostalgia?

In this special episode from our friends at Pop Culture Happy Hour, guest host Ayesha Rascoe joins co-hosts Glen Weldon and Stephen Thompson as well as NPR contributor Cyrena Touros to talk about the new movie Ghostbusters: Afterlife. They discuss why it's hard to recapture the original Ghostbusters magic and if the latest installment of the franchise added more to its world — or not.

Presenting 'Pop Culture Happy Hour': is 'Ghostbusters: Afterlife' stuck in nostalgia?

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Stephanie Beatriz voices Mirabel in the new Disney film Encanto. Disney hide caption

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Disney

Virgil Abloh was the artistic director for Louis Vuitton menswear and the founder of the label Off-White. He died on Sunday after a private battle with cancer. He was 41. Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Qatar Museums hide caption

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Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Qatar Museums

The Beatles, seen preparing for their final show on Jan. 30, 1969 in London. Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Evening Standard/Getty Images

New docuseries gives fans unprecedented access to The Beatles

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Steven Van Zandt [left], James Gandolfini and Tony Sirico starred in HBO's hit television series, The Sopranos. HBO/Getty Images hide caption

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HBO/Getty Images

HBO revolutionized TV, but the next few years are tipped to be pivotal for its future

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Jenée Desmond-Harris gives advice as Slate's Dear Prudence columnist. Courtesy of Slate hide caption

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Courtesy of Slate

From Taylor Swift to Thanksgiving, Dear Prudence gives the gift of advice

What better gift to give this holiday season than the gift of... advice? And solicited advice at that! For this episode, Sam is joined by Jenée Desmond-Harris, Slate's Dear Prudence advice columnist, to help answer everything from how to deal with a partner's overbearing adult daughter to a boyfriend's recent conversion to becoming a Swiftie (read: a fan of Taylor Swift) to the group dynamics of the Thanksgiving prayer in an atheist household. Happy holidays, everybody.

From Taylor Swift to Thanksgiving, Dear Prudence gives the gift of advice

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Aunjanue Ellis, Mikayla Bartholomew, Will Smith, Saniyya Sidney, Demi Singleton and Danielle Lawson in King Richard. Warner Bros. hide caption

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Warner Bros.

John Cho, Mustafa Shakir, and Daniella Pineda in Netflix's Cowboy Bebop. Geoffrey Short/Netflix hide caption

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Geoffrey Short/Netflix