Buttigieg Confirmed As Transportation Secretary By Senate : President Biden Takes Office The 39-year-old former South Bend, Ind. mayor is both the first openly gay man confirmed to a Cabinet position and the youngest member of President Biden's Cabinet.
NPR logo Pete Buttigieg Confirmed As Transportation Secretary

Pete Buttigieg Confirmed As Transportation Secretary

The Senate confirmed Pete Buttigieg to be President Biden's transportation secretary on Tuesday. Buttigieg is the first openly gay man to win Senate confirmation to a Cabinet post. Ken Cedeno/AP hide caption

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Ken Cedeno/AP

The Senate confirmed Pete Buttigieg to be President Biden's transportation secretary on Tuesday. Buttigieg is the first openly gay man to win Senate confirmation to a Cabinet post.

Ken Cedeno/AP

Updated at 3:33 p.m. ET

Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg made history Tuesday, becoming the first openly gay man to win Senate confirmation to run a Cabinet department.

Buttigieg was easily confirmed as secretary of transportation by a vote of 86-13.

After the vote, Buttigieg tweeted that he was "honored and humbled by today's vote in the Senate-and ready to get to work."

A former rival of President Biden's for the Democratic presidential nomination, Buttigieg is at age 39 the youngest member of Biden's Cabinet. He will take the reins at a sprawling agency, with jurisdiction over everything from federal highways to pipelines, air traffic and railroads, employing some 55,000 people.

The Department is also poised to play a major role in the new administration's efforts to combat climate change. Biden has said his infrastructure improvement proposals would include the "second great railroad revolution," and that he would seek funding "to build more climate-resilient communities to deal with more extreme floods, droughts and super storms."

Buttigieg has become one of the most visible faces of the administration even before his confirmation, appearing on The Tonight Show, The View as well as other outlets.

When his nomination was announced, Buttigieg said he was "mindful that the eyes of history are on this appointment," saying he recalled as a 17-year-old seeing the news that one of then-President Bill Clinton's intended nominees was denied a Senate vote because he was gay. During his confirmation hearing, Buttigieg's husband, Chasten, sat behind him in the hearing room.