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NFL Players Pen Op-Ed Calling For Changes To America's Justice System

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The South Korean soccer team poses for a photo prior to the 2018 FIFA World Cup match against Sweden at Nizhny Novgorod Stadium on June 18, 2018 in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. Clive Mason/Getty Images hide caption

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Clive Mason/Getty Images

The Science Behind South Korea's Race-Based World Cup Strategy

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Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen takes questions from reporters at the White House on Monday. She acknowledged that the Trump administration changed the way it is enforcing immigration law, resulting in separation of thousands of children from parents entering the country illegally. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Defiant Homeland Security Secretary Defends Family Separations

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NYC Mayor On Diversity Problems With City's Elite Public High Schools

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Archbishop Thomas Wenski of Miami, photographed at a news conference in 2015, said the Trump administration's policy of separating immigrant children from their families "goes against the values of our nation." Sid Hastings/AP hide caption

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Sid Hastings/AP

Roxane Gay on the TED stage. Marla Aufmuth/TED hide caption

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Marla Aufmuth/TED

Roxane Gay: What Does It Mean To Identify As A Feminist?

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Taiye Selasi on the TED stage. James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

Taiye Selasi: How Do The Places We Call Home Inform Our Identities?

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Dorothy Cotton, pictured at a press conference at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., was the educational director for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the civil rights era. She has died at 88. Dorothy Cotton Institute hide caption

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Dorothy Cotton Institute

Ron Stallworth (pictured here in 1975) was the first black detective in the history of the Colorado Springs Police Department. Courtesy of Ron Stallworth hide caption

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Courtesy of Ron Stallworth

How A Black Detective Infiltrated The KKK

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Tommy Orange's debut novel features a wide cast of characters who are all Native American, with varying degrees of connection to the culture. He says, "I wanted to represent a range of human experience as a way to humanize Native people." Joana Toro for NPR hide caption

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Joana Toro for NPR

Native American Author Tommy Orange Feels A 'Burden To Set The Record Straight'

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Robert F. Kennedy stands in an open-top convertible and shakes hands with members of a crowd as he campaigns for the democratic Presidential nomination in Detroit on May 15, 1968. Andrew Sacks/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Sacks/Getty Images

The Education Of Bobby Kennedy — On Race

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From left Bishop James Shannon, Rabbi Abraham Heschel, Dr. Martin Luther King and Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath. Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington Cemetery, February 6, 1968. Charles Del Vecchio/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Del Vecchio/Washington Post/Getty Images

Dr. Mai Khanh Tran, a Democrat seeking election to the U.S. House of Representatives to represent the 39th Congressional District of California, canvasses last weekend in Rowland Heights, Calif. The predominantly Asian-American community lies in historically conservative Orange County. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Asian-American Voters Could Become A Force In Historically Red Orange County

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