Race NPR stories on race and ethnicity and race's effects on politics, culture, society.

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Charity leader Ngozi Fulani (center left) attends a reception held by Britain's Camilla, the queen consort, (center) to raise awareness of violence against women and girls in Buckingham Palace in London on Tuesday. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., ran unopposed for the position of House Democratic leader. He replaces Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who announced she would not run for the top leadership post after Democrats lost control of the House in the midterms. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries elected as leader of the House Democrats

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"Racial imposter syndrome" is definitely "a thing," for many people. Shereen and Gene hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Social scientists weigh in the need basic need for belonging. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas testifies before a Senate subcommittee on homeland security on Capitol Hill on May 4. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

A fight over how to enforce immigration laws reaches the Supreme Court

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America Ferrera (clockwise from top left), Eva Longoria, Rosie Perez, Ivette Rodriguez, Rosario Dawson and Christy Haubegger are using their platforms to promote empowerment and representation. Mike Gallegos for NPR hide caption

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Mike Gallegos for NPR

Mario, Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez, 1983. Carol Kovinick Hernandez/Fantagraphics hide caption

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Carol Kovinick Hernandez/Fantagraphics

'Love and Rockets' celebrates 40 years of edgy, Latinx, alternative comics

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Republican Monica De La Cruz-Hernandez flipped the 15th House Congressional District in one of Texas' only remaining competitive districts. In this file photo, she talks in her office in Alamo, Texas, July 8, 2021. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Republicans make marginal gains in South Texas as Democratic power wanes

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Atlan Arceo-Witzl for NPR

Former first lady Michelle Obama published her memoir Becoming in November 2018. Chuck Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Chuck Kennedy/NPR

James Whitfield, former principal at Colleyville Heritage High School in Colleyville, Texas, in a photo taken at his home in Hurst, Texas, last year. Ben Torres for the Texas Tribune hide caption

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Ben Torres for the Texas Tribune

Democratic candidate for governor Wes Moore speaks during a rally with President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden during a rally on the eve of the midterm elections, at Bowie State University in Bowie, Md., on Nov. 7. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing Wednesday a challenge from Texas and several families who have adopted Native American children who are challenging the Indian Child Welfare Act. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Supreme Court considers fate of landmark Indian adoption law

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Clockwise from top left: Sarah Huckabee Sanders, Stacey Abrams, Wes Moore, Tina Kotek, Maura Healey, and Kathy Hochul. All are 2022 candidates for governor who would make history if elected. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; Nathan Posner/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images; Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images; Mary Schwalm/AP; Anthony Behar/Sipa/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Mathieu Lewis-Rolland/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; Nathan Posner/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images; Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images; Mary Schwalm/AP; Anthony Behar/Sipa/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Mathieu Lewis-Rolland/Getty Images

Six races for governor that could make history this midterm election

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The Boston Bruins have cut ties with Mitchell Miller after current players and the NHL spoke out against Miller's signing. Miller admitted to bullying a Black classmate with developmental disabilities when he was 14. Eldon Holmes/Tri-City Storm hide caption

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Eldon Holmes/Tri-City Storm