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Member Of Congressional Black Caucus: Trump Has Brought Normalized Racism To White House

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"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

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A century ago, many new immigrants to the United States ended up returning home. And it often took a while for those who stayed to learn English and integrate into American society. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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The Huddled Masses And The Myth Of America

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'They Didn't Want Me There': Remembering The Terror Of School Integration

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Georgia Gilmore adjusts her hat for photographers in 1956 during the bus boycott trial of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Montgomery, Ala. She testified: "When you pay your fare and they count the money, they don't know the Negro money from white money." AP hide caption

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AP

Meet The Fearless Cook Who Secretly Fed — And Funded — The Civil Rights Movement

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Martin Luther King Jr. Day: Reflecting On The Legacy Of The Civil Rights Movement

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Shalon Irving, a public health researcher who worked for the Centers for Disease Control and and Prevention who was studying the physical toll that discrimination exacts on physical health, died just a few weeks after giving birth to her daughter, Soleil. Black women are 243% more likely than white women to die during or shortly after childbirth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Immigrants arrive at Ellis Island in Upper New York Bay around 1900. In 1924, the U.S. would restrict immigration based on national origin. Forty years after that, it eliminated those restrictions. Buyenlarge/Getty Images hide caption

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What President Trump's Comments Say About His Views On Race

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The game Buffalo prompts players to think of people that buck stereotypes, and subliminally challenges those stereotypes in the process. Maanvi Singh for NPR hide caption

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Maanvi Singh for NPR

Fighting Bias With Board Games

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The W.K. Kellogg Foundation's Pledge To Fight Racism Starts With 'National Day Of Racial Healing'

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President Trump walks from the Oval Office to speak with members of the press just before departing the White House to spend the weekend Camp David. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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ESPN columnist Jemele Hill attends ESPN The Party on Feb. 5, 2016 in San Francisco. Robin Marchant/Getty Images hide caption

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ESPN's Jemele Hill On Race, Football And That Tweet About Trump

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Remembering Anti-Police Brutality Activist Erica Garner, Who Died At 27

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In 2014, Erica Garner led a protest march in New York City after a grand jury decided not to indict a police officer involved in the death of her father, Eric Garner. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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