Race NPR stories on race and ethnicity and race's effects on politics, culture, society.

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The campus of Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Georgetown University and several other schools including Yale, MIT, and Notre Dame were named in a lawsuit alleging that they colluded to limit financial aid. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The financial aid conspiracy; plus, 'For Colored Nerds'

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Footmen walk alongside the Golden Carriage as Netherlands' King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima arrive at Noordeinde Palace on Sept. 17, 2013. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Virginia's Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin, pictured on the campaign trail, speaks with now Lt. Gov.-elect Winsome Sears after a rally in Fredericksburg, Va., Oct. 30, 2021. Youngkin and Sears, both Republicans, won election on Nov. 2, and will be sworn into office Jan. 15, 2022. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Virginia's first Black woman lieutenant governor says we need to move on from slavery

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Joelle Avelino Joelle Avelino hide caption

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Joelle Avelino

Friends Jennifer Chudy, an assistant professor of political science at Wellesley College who studies white public opinion around race, and Hakeem Jefferson, an assistant professor at Stanford University, scoured public opinion data together in order to write an essay for the New York Times last May called: "Support for the Black Lives Matter Movement Surged Last Year: Did It Last?" Lisa Abitbol; Harrison Truong/NPR hide caption

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Lisa Abitbol; Harrison Truong/NPR

The Maya Angelou quarter is the first in the American Women Quarters Program, which will feature other prominent women in U.S. history. The other quarters in the series will begin rolling out later this year and through 2025, according to the U.S. Mint. Burwell and Burwell Photography/United States Mint image hide caption

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Burwell and Burwell Photography/United States Mint image

From left, Travis McMichael, William "Roddie" Bryan and Gregory McMichael were convicted of multiple murder charges in late November. Stephen B. Morton; Octavio Jones/Pool/AP hide caption

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Stephen B. Morton; Octavio Jones/Pool/AP

Corinne Tan is American Girl's 2022 Girl of the Year, and the first Chinese American doll to hold that title. The company says her story will teach kids about standing up to racism, among other lessons. Business Wire hide caption

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Business Wire

Keith Plessy and Phoebe Ferguson, descendants of the principals in the Plessy V. Ferguson court case, pose for a photograph in front of a historical marker in New Orleans, on Tuesday, June 7, 2011. Homer Plessy, the namesake of the U.S. Supreme Court's 1896 "separate but equal" ruling, was granted a posthumous pardon, Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2022. Bill Haber/AP hide caption

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Bill Haber/AP

A painting by artist Sidney King depicting a Dutch ship with 20 enslaved African people arriving at Point Comfort, VA in 1619, marking the beginning of slavery in America. Sidney King/Associated Press hide caption

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Sidney King/Associated Press

A frozen section of the Ross Sea at Scott Base in Antarctica on Nov. 12, 2016. Britain's Preet Chandi made history by trekking 700 miles from Hercules Inlet to the South Pole in an unsupported expedition. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

Tesla CEO Elon Musk arrives on the red carpet for the Axel Springer media award in Berlin in 2020. Activists are appealing to Tesla to close a new showroom in China's northwestern region of Xinjiang, where officials are accused of abuses against mostly Muslim ethnic minorities. Hannibal Hanschke/AP file photo hide caption

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Hannibal Hanschke/AP file photo

Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator and author of the 1619 Project. The New York Times hide caption

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The New York Times

Presenting 'Throughline': Nikole Hannah-Jones and the war over history

In this special episode from our friends at Throughline, co-hosts Rund Abdelfatah and Ramtin Arablouei explore the war over history with Nikole Hannah-Jones, an investigative journalist at The New York Times and the creator of the 1619 Project. They discuss how the 1619 Project became one of the most dramatic battlegrounds in the fight over our country's historical narratives — and whether an agreed upon history could ever exist.

Presenting 'Throughline': Nikole Hannah-Jones and the war over history

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Christopher McNair, center left, and Maxine McNair, right, parents of Denise McNair, one of four African American girls who died in a church bombing in Birmingham, Ala., on Sept. 15, 1963, are shown here at a news conference in New York later that month. Maxine McNair, the last living parent of any of the children killed in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church, died on Sunday at 93. AP hide caption

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AP

Whitney Houston sings the National Anthem prior to Super Bowl XXV on January 27, 1991. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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George Rose/Getty Images

Looking back at Whitney Houston's 1991 national anthem

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