Race NPR stories on race and ethnicity and race's effects on politics, culture, society.

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Left to Right Aliah Cotman, Ashley White, Shakiyla McPherson and Lucia Boursiquot attend The Black Hair Experience at the National Harbor, Oxon Hill, Md. on Saturday July 17, 2021. Dee Dwyer for NPR hide caption

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Dee Dwyer for NPR

'The Black Hair Experience' Is About The Joy Of Black Hair — Including My Own

The Black Hair Experience is a pop-up visual exhibit dedicated to the beauty, history and nostalgia of Black hair. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe takes a trip there and chats with its co-founder, Alisha Brooks. Then, Ayesha is joined by NPR's Susan Davis and Asma Khalid about the two huge economic priorities for the Biden administration.

'The Black Hair Experience' Is About The Joy Of Black Hair — Including My Own

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Cleveland relief pitcher Nick Sandlin (right) and catcher Austin Hedges celebrate a 10-1 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals on June 8. On Friday, the Cleveland team announced its new name, the Guardians. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

María Lara sits in her bedroom in the Bedford and Victoria Station apartment complex in Langley Park, Md., a densely populated, low-income suburb of Washington, D.C. Ian Morton/NPR hide caption

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Ian Morton/NPR

ESPN's Maria Taylor works from the sidelines during an NCAA college football game between Miami and Florida in 2019. ESPN announced Wednesday that Taylor is leaving the network. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP
NPR

A fence alongside Greenwood Cemetery, in Brooklyn, N.Y., is covered with memorial art for people who died of COVID-19. Pandemic deaths contributed to the biggest drop in life expectancy in decades. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Gloria Richardson, then the head of the Cambridge Nonviolent Action Committee, pushes a National Guardsman's bayonet aside as she moves among a crowd of African Americans to convince them to disperse in Cambridge, Md., in 1963. Richardson, whose determination not to back down while protesting racial inequality, died Thursday in New York, according to her family. She was 99. AP hide caption

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AP

A resident of Reading, Pa., fills out a U.S. census form in 2010. The White House's Office of Management and Budget says it's reviewing proposals that the Census Bureau's researchers say would allow the census to gather more accurate race and ethnicity data about Latinos and people with Middle Eastern or North African origins. Bill Uhrich/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Uhrich/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

In one year, a Denver TV station ousted three Latina journalists: (from left) Kristen Aguirre left in March 2020, Lori Lizarraga left in March 2021 and Sonia Gutierrez left last November. Juan Diego Reyes for NPR; JerSean Golatt for NPR; Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for NPR; JerSean Golatt for NPR; Michele Abercrombie/NPR

Latina Journalists' Ousters From Denver TV Powerhouse Spark Outrage

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Lady Danbury (Adjoa Andoh) and Simon Basset (Regé-Jean Page) in Bridgerton. Liam Daniel/Netflix hide caption

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Liam Daniel/Netflix

The Only 'New' Thing About Cross-Cultural Casting Is Who's Getting The Roles

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A new study says on average someone would have to earn $24.90 per hour to rent a modest two-bedroom home on no more than 30% of their pay. That's far more than the federal minimum wage. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Maria Hinojosa (left) and Maria Garcia. Krystal Quiles for NPR hide caption

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Krystal Quiles for NPR
Laurent Hrybyk for NPR

What Do Alabama And California Have In Common? Top-Notch U.S. History Standards

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Marcellus Cadd likes to go out geocaching with his daughters Zoe, 10, (left) and Gemma, 12, (right). Marcellus Cadd/Marcellus Cadd hide caption

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Marcellus Cadd/Marcellus Cadd

Geocaching While Black: Outdoor Pastime Reveals Racism And Bias

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Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland recently announced the Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative in part, "to address the intergenerational impact of Indian boarding schools." Department of the Interior hide caption

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Department of the Interior

A Federal Probe Into Indian Boarding School Gravesites Seeks To Bring Healing

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During a special emergency meeting, the Charlottesville City Council unanimously voted to remove another a statue of Meriwether Lewis, William Clark and Shoshone interpreter Sacagawea. City of Charlottesville hide caption

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City of Charlottesville

Workers remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from Market Street Park on Saturday in Charlottesville, Va. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Charlottesville Removes Robert E. Lee Statue That Sparked A Deadly Rally

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Ruben Santiago-Hudson and Jeannie Santiago attend the 2017 Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall. Playwright Ruben Santiago-Hudson will both star in his own one-man play, "Lackawanna Blues" and direct "Skeleton Crew" this year. Jemal Countess/Getty Images hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images

Maricopa County constable Darlene Martinez evicts a tenant on October 7, 2020 in Phoenix, Arizona. Thousands of court-ordered evictions continue nationwide despite a Centers for Disease Control (CDC) moratorium for renters impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Eviction Prevention Programs Are Racing Against A Moratorium Clock

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