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What Does It Mean To Be A 'Nation Of Immigrants'?

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Former Democratic Sen. Fred Harris of Oklahoma, seen in August 2017, holds a copy of The Kerner Report, as he discusses its 50th anniversary. Harris is the last surviving member of the Kerner Commission. Russell Contreras/AP hide caption

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Russell Contreras/AP

Report Updates Landmark 1968 Racism Study, Finds More Poverty And Segregation

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Florence Kasumba (left), Angela Bassett and Leititia Wright appear in a scene from Marvel's Black Panther. Sociologist Darnell Hunt says the film's success "demonstrates what's possible beyond standard Hollywood practices." Marvel Studios hide caption

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Marvel Studios

Hollywood Diversity Study Finds 'Mixed Bag' When It Comes To Representation

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W.E.B. Du Bois' The Souls Of Black Folk has been re-published in a new edition for the author's 150th birthday anniversary. C. M. Battey/Getty Images hide caption

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The Enduring Lyricism Of W.E.B. Du Bois' 'The Souls Of Black Folk'

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Tommie Smith and John Carlos, gold and bronze medalists in the 200-meter run at the 1968 Olympic Games, raise their fists to protest the inequity and discrimination that black people in the U.S. face. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

'Tell Them We Are Rising' Tackles Impact Of Historically Black Colleges

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Black Women Gather In Atlanta To Harness Economic And Political Power

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'Black Panther' And The 'Very Important Black Film'

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Algonquin Books

An American Marriage: Redefining The American Love Story

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Gary Lum assists his daughter, Mei Lum, with decorating the storefront window at Wing on Wo & Co. for the Lunar New Year in the Chinatown neighborhood of New York City. The family imported the unique handmade lion-head dance costume from Hong Kong nearly 50 years ago. Annie Ling for NPR hide caption

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Annie Ling for NPR

Valentine's Day cards created by artist and activist Tanzila Ahmed tackle Islamophobia with snark and humor. Courtesy of Tanzila Ahmed hide caption

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Courtesy of Tanzila Ahmed

'You've Hijacked My Heart': Valentines That Fight Islamophobia With Humor

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Thromentta Anderson, the owner of Pass Da Peas in northwest Milwaukee likes to greet customers by name and give them tokens toward free drinks. But he was glad to see new faces during Black Restaurant Week. Alan Greenblatt for NPR hide caption

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Alan Greenblatt for NPR

The student newspaper reports the white male professor used the racial slur multiple times during the following discussion, despite increasingly strong objections from some students. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

How Ranchera Music Helped 1 Woman Fall In Love With Her Mexican Culture

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