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Comedian Chris Rock hosting the Oscars on Sunday. Rock's razor-sharp monologue skewered sensibilities on all sides of the #OscarsSoWhite debate. Christopher Polk/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Polk/Getty Images

For Better Or Worse, Chris Rock Made The Oscars As Black As He Possibly Could

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'Black-ish' Opens Conversation About Race And Police Brutality

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Seu Jorge Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Brazilian Singer Seu Jorge: On Music, Race, And Luck Versus Hard Work

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Jack Gibson is one of several disc jockeys and other stars of early black radio who is featured in the Google Cultural Archive. Indiana University's Archives of African American Music and Culture hide caption

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Indiana University's Archives of African American Music and Culture

Archive Spotlights The "Golden Age" Of Black Radio

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Hollywood's Dolby Theater will be a lot fuller Sunday night than this random theater we found on Flickr. But Spike Lee and Ava DuVernay have other things to do that night — and now, so can you! Kevin Jaako/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Kevin Jaako/Flickr Creative Commons

Muhammad Ali, world heavyweight boxing champion, stands with Malcolm X (left) outside the Trans-Lux Newsreel Theater in New York in 1964. AP hide caption

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AP

Muhammad Ali And Malcolm X: A Broken Friendship, An Enduring Legacy

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Director Spike Lee, in a radio ad released Tuesday endorsing Bernie Sanders says the Vermont Senator will "do the right thing" when he's in the White House. Axel Schmidt/AP hide caption

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Axel Schmidt/AP

Chefs at work in the kitchen of a restaurant in New York's Chinatown, circa 1940. For many Chinese, opening up restaurants became a way to bypass U.S. immigration laws designed to keep them out of the country. Weegee(Arthur Fellig)/International Center of Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Weegee(Arthur Fellig)/International Center of Photography/Getty Images

The world-famous Hollywood sign in the Hollywood Hills in Los Angeles. Chris Sattlberger/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Sattlberger/Getty Images

Hollywood Has A Major Diversity Problem, USC Study Finds

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