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Recipes

Kenji López-Alt says spatchcocking the turkey is the best way to overcome the common problem of light meat overcooking by the time dark meat is ready. Viktoria Agureeva/Getty Images hide caption

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Viktoria Agureeva/Getty Images

How to make the juiciest, tastiest Thanksgiving turkey, according to science

Turkey is the usual centerpiece of the Thanksgiving dinner, but it's all too easy to end up with a dry, tough, flavorless bird. For NPR science correspondent Maria Godoy, it got so bad that several years ago, her family decided to abandon the turkey tradition altogether. Can science help her make a better bird this year? That's what she hopes as she seeks expert advice from food science writers and cookbook authors Nik Sharma and Kenji López-Alt.

How to make the juiciest, tastiest Thanksgiving turkey, according to science

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It's tradition: Every year, Susan Stamberg sneaks her mother-in-law's cranberry relish recipe onto the air. This year, she's also sharing another cranberry recipe, too — a chutney from actor and food writer Madhur Jaffrey. Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren McCollester/Getty Images

This year, Mama Stamberg's relish shares the table with cranberry chutney

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In Lan Lam's recipe, the turkey is cooked in a preheated roasting pan placed on top of a preheated pizza stone or pizza steel to deliver more heat to the legs and thighs. "By the time the breasts hit 160 degrees, the legs are done and you don't have to go in and do much to the turkey," she says. America's Test Kitchen hide caption

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America's Test Kitchen

This Thanksgiving turkey recipe skips a stressful step: Flipping the bird

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The classic version of the icebox cake uses Nabisco Famous Chocolate Wafers, which were discontinued earlier this year. Zoe Francois hide caption

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Zoe Francois

Famous Chocolate Wafers are no more, but the icebox cake lives on

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A growing and sophisticated variety of alcohol-free beverages are hitting bars, restaurants and grocery stores as mocktails become more popular. America's Test Kitchen hide caption

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America's Test Kitchen

Fake drinks that don't taste fake: The rise of the mocktail

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Eugenia Cheng is a mathematician and author of the book How to Bake Pi: An Edible Exploration of the Mathematics of Mathematics. Throughout the book, she uses baking as a vehicle for better understanding mathematics concepts. Basic Books hide caption

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Basic Books

This Pi Day, how to BAKE pi(e) — and have mathematical fun

This March 14, Short Wave is celebrating pi ... and pie! We do that with the help of mathematician Eugenia Cheng, Scientist In Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and author of the book How to Bake Pi. We start with a recipe for clotted cream and end, deliciously, at how math is so much more expansive than grade school tests.

This Pi Day, how to BAKE pi(e) — and have mathematical fun

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Cover art of Raghavan Iyer's new book "On The Curry Trail: Chasing the Flavor That Seduced the World" Courtesy of Workman Publishing hide caption

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Courtesy of Workman Publishing

Iconic Indian-American Chef Reflects On His Life And The Healing Power Of Food

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Decorations for Lunar New Year are on display at a shop in Hong Kong. Celebrations start this weekend as millions welcome the year of the rabbit. Vernon Yuen/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Vernon Yuen/NurPhoto via Getty Images

These Lunar New Year dishes remind those who make them of their family and friends

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Steve Lacy performs at The Fillmore Silver Spring in Maryland on Oct. 15, 2022. Kyle Gustafson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Kyle Gustafson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Despite its name, Weeknight Meaty Chili is actually a vegetarian dish. Joe Keller/America's Test Kitchen hide caption

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Joe Keller/America's Test Kitchen

Love chili but trying to eat less meat? 'Morning Edition' tests a plant-based version

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Due to high inflation this year, NPR's Business desk shares cheaper dishes to substitute for Thanksgiving stables. Maansi Srivastava/NPR hide caption

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Maansi Srivastava/NPR

Inflation won't win Thanksgiving: Here's NPR's plan to help you save on a meal

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Melissa Clark's Sheet Pan Thanksgiving recipe is an easy-to-prepare meal for the holiday or throughout the year. Linda Xiao hide caption

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Linda Xiao

This is the one-pan recipe to make your Thanksgiving easy

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Stu Haley's Grandma Monnette created a Thanksgiving side dish, dressing balls, to avoid using stuffing from inside the turkey. Stu Haley/Collage by NPR hide caption

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Stu Haley/Collage by NPR

When making Thanksgiving dressing, Grandma Monnette had one simple rule

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Deb Perelman in her small "smitten" kitchen in New York City's East Village. "I make it work!" she says. "I like that there's a lot of light coming in." Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block/NPR

Stuck on veggie ideas for Thanksgiving? The Smitten Kitchen has some advice

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In her 1796 cookbook, American Cookery, Amelia Simmons recommends serving turkey or other fowl "with boiled onions and cranberry-sauce, mangoes, pickles or celery." Not long after, (give or take 180+ years), Susan Stamberg began sharing her mother in law's cranberry relish recipe on NPR. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

When turkey met cranberries — a dinner date from the 1700s

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McFadden wrote about butter boards as early as 2017, when he released the cookbook Six Seasons: A New Way With Vegetables. Laura Dart hide caption

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Laura Dart

Use these tips to have fun with the latest food trend — butter boards

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Tabitha Brown says her spicy Caribbean-style jackfruit tacos are one of her favorite go-to meals. Matt Armendariz hide caption

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Matt Armendariz

For this TikTok star, cooking from the spirit is much more than a recipe

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Molly Yeh's kimchi cheddar Jucy Lucy. Yeh says the burger, where the cheese is inside the meat, originated in Minnesota, where she lives with her family. Chantell & Brett Quernemoen hide caption

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Chantell & Brett Quernemoen

Food Network stars also juggle work and family. This one made a cookbook for us all

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Emily Meggett, the author of Gullah Geechee Home Cooking. Meggett published her cookbook at age 89. Clay Williams/Courtesy of Abrams hide caption

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Clay Williams/Courtesy of Abrams

For Gullah Geechee chef Emily Meggett, cooking was about heart

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You can have kimchi fried rice, too — just listen to some tunes! Jongdal Jeong/Getty Images hide caption

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Jongdal Jeong/Getty Images

A kimchi fried rice playlist on Spotify teaches you how to make the dish

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