Religion NPR's stories on U.S. and world religion, spirituality, ethics, and moral issues affecting society and culture. Subscribe to NPR Religion RSS feeds.

Religion

Pope Francis remains popular among U.S. Catholics, with 75% having favorable views of him, according to a Pew Research report. But many self-identified Catholics disagree with various teachings of their church. Andrew Medichini/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Medichini/AP

Pastry maker Rafe' Rummaneh, shown here in his home outside Ramallah in the occupied West Bank on April 9, is only making a few treats for friends this Eid. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Catie Dull/NPR

People visit a NASA information booth to grab solar eclipse glasses in Russellville, Arkansas. The space agency has debunked a number of myths about the total solar eclipse — including ideas about food going bad, or unborn babies being harmed. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

The crowd looks in direction of the window of the apostolic palace overlooking St. Peter's square during Pope Francis' prayer on April 1 in The Vatican. TizianaI Fabi/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
TizianaI Fabi/AFP via Getty Images

The Vatican says surrogacy and gender theory are 'grave threats' to human dignity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243374931/1243511484" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

CAIR says the largest number of anti-Muslim bias reports involved employment discrimination, including companies saying they wouldn't hire people who participated in pro-Palestinian rallies. ALLISON BAILEY/Middle East Images/AFP via Getty hide caption

toggle caption
ALLISON BAILEY/Middle East Images/AFP via Getty

Anti-Muslim bias reports skyrocket after Oct. 7 Hamas attack on Israel

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1242021356/1242196833" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Muslims gather to hold a demonstration to demand ceasefire for Gaza in front of the White House on the first day of the holy month of Ramadan on March 11. Anadolu/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anadolu/Getty Images

The White House plans a smaller Ramadan gathering as the war in Gaza continues

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241988655/1242338478" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sikhs hold a rally in Sacramento, California ahead of a March 31 referendum for independence. Sandhya Dirks/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sandhya Dirks/NPR

Sikhs in California vote on independence from India

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241808874/1241836336" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Judge Alla Nazarova attends a hearing in the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation in Moscow on Nov. 25, 2021. Dmitry Serebryakov/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dmitry Serebryakov/AP

Opinion: Russian Jehovah's Witnesses remain devout despite facing bans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241753168/1241836330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr marching from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama alongside Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel. William Lovelace/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
William Lovelace/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Fractures in the Grand Alliance between Black and Jewish Americans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239289512/1239478414" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Then-President Donald Trump holds up a Bible outside St. John's Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C., during a controversial 2020 photo-op. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The PRRI poll found that the vast majority of those who are unaffiliated are content to stay that way. Just 9% of respondents say they're looking for a religion that would be right for them. Hanan Isachar/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hanan Isachar/Getty Images

People say they're leaving religion due to anti-LGBTQ teachings and sexual abuse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1240811895/1241116201" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a recent lawsuit, Jose Manuel Castro, pastor of the Gethsemani Baptist Church, says friction with the city of San Luis has forced the church to cancel multiple events, including its annual Thanksgiving turkey drive-thru. Jose Manuel Castro hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Manuel Castro

Jewish men and children in Purim costumes celebrate in the Mea Shearim ultra-Orthodox neighbourhood in Jerusalem, on March 18, 2022. The Purim holiday is celebrated with parades and costume parties to commemorate the deliverance of the Jewish people from a plot to exterminate them in the ancient Persian empire 2,500 years ago, as recorded in the Biblical Book of Esther. Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images

Purim — a festive Jewish holiday with an ending often ignored

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1240037244/1240461662" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Opponents of the ban on female genital mutilation (FGM) gather outside the National Assembly in Banjul, The Gambia, on March 18, 2024. Lawmakers voted to advance a highly controversial bill that would lift the ban on FGM. Muhamadou Bittaye/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Muhamadou Bittaye/AFP via Getty Images

The Catholic Church officially opposes in vitro fertilization, yet many Catholics don't view IVF as morally wrong. Filippo Monteforte/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Filippo Monteforte/AFP via Getty Images

Despite church prohibitions, Catholics still choose IVF to have children

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239879602/1240304876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Catherine Coldstream spent 12 years in a Carmelite monastery. Her new memoir is Cloistered. Keiko Ikeuchi/MacMillan hide caption

toggle caption
Keiko Ikeuchi/MacMillan

A former nun explains why she ran away from her 'Cloistered' life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239633773/1239698629" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The 92nd Street Y, New York is celebrating its 150th anniversary. As a Jewish cultural institution, it's also facing criticism related to the Israel-Hamas war. 92NY hide caption

toggle caption
92NY

92NY, a historic cultural center, turns 150 — grappling with today's Israel-Hamas war

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1238887546/1239609196" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Worshippers attend a concert by evangelical musician Sean Feucht on the National Mall on Oct. 25, 2020, in Washington, D.C. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

An 'exvangelical' on loving, leaving and reporting on the culture of Christianity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239122282/1239228321" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This close-up of the Verona astrolabe shows Arabic and Hebrew markings. Federica Gigante hide caption

toggle caption
Federica Gigante

This medieval astrolabe has both Arabic and Hebrew markings. Here's what it means

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1238815651/1238824880" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Indians raise their tied hands and shout slogans during a protest against the Citizenship Amendment Act in New Delhi, India, Dec. 27, 2019. Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government on Monday announced rules to implement a 2019 citizenship law that critics say is discriminatory against Muslims, weeks before the Hindu nationalist leader will seek a third term in office. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manish Swarup/AP