Religion NPR's stories on U.S. and world religion, spirituality, ethics, and moral issues affecting society and culture. Subscribe to NPR Religion RSS feeds.

Religion

Public officials including Israeli Knesset President Mickey Levy, German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz attend a wreath-laying ceremony on International Holocaust Remembrance Day at the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe on Thursday in Berlin. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Salomon Abend, second from the left, at Beaune La Rolande. U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

A discovery of Holocaust-era photos helps a Jewish family connect with its past

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1075317667/1076199900" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Congregation Beth Israel Rabbi Charlie Cytron-Walker, facing the camera, hugs a man after a healing service on Jan. 17, two days after he and three others were taken hostage at his Colleyville, Texas, synagogue. Yffy Yossifor/Star-Telegram/via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Yffy Yossifor/Star-Telegram/via AP

Vietnamese Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh arrives for a great chanting ceremony at Vinh Nghiem Pagoda in Ho Chi Minh City in 2007. Nhat Hanh, who helped pioneer the concept of mindfulness in the West, died at age 95 on Saturday. AP file photo hide caption

toggle caption
AP file photo

The former Pope Benedict XVI, seen here in 2010, did not intervene in four cases of sexual abuse when he was the archbishop of Munich and Freising, according to a law firm's new report. The inquiry was commissioned by the archdiocese. Andreas Solaro/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andreas Solaro/AFP via Getty Images

Rabbi Charlie Cytron-Walker talks to reporters following a special service arranged days after a 44-year-old British national held the rabbi and three others hostage inside the Congregation Beth Israel synagogue in Colleyville, TX. Emil Lippe/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Emil Lippe/Getty Images

'We can't live in fear': Texas rabbi held hostage says he'd give a stranger tea again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1074191124/1074202164" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Nusrat Choudhury, lead attorney for the National ACLU National Security Program, speaks with reporters following oral arguments on the ACLU No Fly List challenge, in Portland, Ore., on May 11, 2012. President Biden has nominated Choudhury to be a federal judge in the Eastern District of New York. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rick Bowmer/AP

Congregation Beth Israel synagogue on Monday in Colleyville, Texas, where a 44-year-old British national held four people hostage for more than 10 hours over the weekend. Emil Lippe/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Emil Lippe/Getty Images

Synagogues have to balance security with remaining welcoming, a Texas rabbi says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1073732616/1073732617" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chamath Palihapitiya, a 45-year-old venture capitalist and minority owner of the Golden State Warriors, is under attack on Twitter for saying, "Nobody cares" about the Uyghur genocide in China. Brian Ach/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Ach/Getty Images

Martin Luther King Jr. spoke at Rabbi Israel Dresner's synagogue, Temple Sha'arey Shalom, in Springfield, N.J., on Jan. 18, 1963. Dresner became close to King when he was an activist for civil rights in the 1960s. Avi Dresner hide caption

toggle caption
Avi Dresner

Israel Dresner, rabbi who marched with Martin Luther King, dies at 92

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1073219153/1073420460" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In this Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021 file photo, a man holds a Bible as Trump supporters gather outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C. The Christian imagery and rhetoric on view during the Capitol insurrection are sparking renewed debate about the societal effects of melding Christian faith with an exclusionary breed of nationalism. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Minchillo/AP

Christian nationalism is still thriving — and is a force for returning Trump to power

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1073215412/1073215413" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Virginia's Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin, pictured on the campaign trail, speaks with now Lt. Gov.-elect Winsome Sears after a rally in Fredericksburg, Va., Oct. 30, 2021. Youngkin and Sears, both Republicans, won election on Nov. 2, and will be sworn into office Jan. 15, 2022. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

Virginia's first Black woman lieutenant governor says we need to move on from slavery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1072153233/1072678686" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tesla CEO Elon Musk arrives on the red carpet for the Axel Springer media award in Berlin in 2020. Activists are appealing to Tesla to close a new showroom in China's northwestern region of Xinjiang, where officials are accused of abuses against mostly Muslim ethnic minorities. Hannibal Hanschke/AP file photo hide caption

toggle caption
Hannibal Hanschke/AP file photo

Members of Women of the Wall gather around a Torah scroll the group smuggled in for their Rosh Hodesh prayers marking the new month, at the Western Wall where women are forbidden from reading from the Tora. Maya Alleruzzo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Maya Alleruzzo/AP

Mpho Tutu, sits with the coffin of her father, Anglican Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, during his funeral at the St. George's Cathedral in Cape Town, South Africa, on Saturday. Nic Bothma/Pool Photo via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Nic Bothma/Pool Photo via AP

In 1986, South African activist, Nobel Peace Prize recipient and Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu receives the Martin Luther King Jr. Nonviolent Peace Prize for his commitment and role during the struggle against apartheid, from Coretta Scott King (left), her daughter Christine King Farris (rear) and Tutu's daughter Nontombi Naomi Tutu. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/AFP/Getty Images