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Cardinal George Pell, shown leaving court in Melbourne in May, was reportedly found guilty of sexual abuse, but Australian media are barred from reporting the news. Robert Cianflone/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary President R. Albert Mohler, Jr. speaks at the school's convocation ceremony in 2013. Mohler, who has led the seminary for 25 years, commissioned a report on the role racism and support for slavery played in its origin and growth. Bruce Schreiner/AP hide caption

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Bruce Schreiner/AP

Southern Baptist Seminary Confronts History Of Slaveholding And 'Deep Racism'

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Eleanor Roosevelt holds up a copy of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the United Nations in December 1948. Fotosearch/Getty Images hide caption

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Fotosearch/Getty Images

Boundlessly Idealistic, Universal Declaration Of Human Rights Is Still Resisted

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Anthony Schmidt, associate curator of Bible and Religion in America at the museum, says the first instance of the abridged version of the Bible titled, Parts of the Holy Bible, selected for the use of the Negro Slaves, in the British West-India Islands, was published in 1807. Museum of the Bible hide caption

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Museum of the Bible

Slave Bible From The 1800s Omitted Key Passages That Could Incite Rebellion

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Andrea Mantegna's Madonna della Vittoria, housed in the Louvre in Paris, includes a depiction of Adam, Eve and those tempting apples. Christophel Fine Art/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Christophel Fine Art/UIG via Getty Images

Opinion: Satanic Display Shows Power Of The Bible

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Adam Roseman, 52, and Rick Rosenthal, 66, pose after their StoryCorps interview in Atlanta. Brenda Ford/StoryCorps hide caption

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Brenda Ford/StoryCorps

He Is Jewish, But Being Santa Is His Calling

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American priest Kenneth Hendricks is accused of abusing at least 10 young boys in the Philippines; U.S. officials who sought his arrest are now trying to learn if there are any victims in Ohio, where he was previously based. Bureau of Immigration (Philippines)/AP hide caption

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Bureau of Immigration (Philippines)/AP

A crowd of faith-based progressive activists rally in Indianapolis. The religious left in Indiana are working to make inroads in the state legislature, long-dominated by conservative Republicans. Lauren Chapman/Indiana Public Media hide caption

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Lauren Chapman/Indiana Public Media

Indiana's Religious Left Flexes Its Political Muscle

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According to the Illinois Secretary of State's office, the temple has the same rights as religious organizations when it comes to displays in the statehouse. Brian Mackey/NPR Illinois 91.9 UIS hide caption

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Brian Mackey/NPR Illinois 91.9 UIS

A relief under Rome's Arch of Titus, built in the first century, shows a menorah being taken away from the Temple in Jerusalem. DEA/Archivio J. Lange/De Agostini/Getty Images hide caption

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DEA/Archivio J. Lange/De Agostini/Getty Images

At Congregation Beth Shalom in Pittsburgh, families across the Jewish community will gather at the annual "Latkepalooza" to mark their first Hanukkuh since the shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in October. Alan Freed/Reuters hide caption

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Alan Freed/Reuters

A Grieving Pittsburgh Focuses On Community And Light In Hanukkah Celebrations

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Sikh worshippers gather outside their holiest site, the Gurdwara Darbar Sahib Kartarpur. It is believed to be the place where the founder of Sikhism, Guru Nanak, died in the 16th century. In a rare goodwill gesture this week, India and Pakistan broke ground on a corridor that will allow visa-free travel for Indian Sikhs to the holy site. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

In Gesture To India, Pakistan To Open Cross-Border Pathway To Sikh Holy Site

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John Allen Chau, an American self-styled adventurer and Christian missionary, was killed and buried by a tribe of hunter-gatherers on a remote island in the Indian Ocean where he had gone to proselytize, according to local law enforcement officials. @johnachau via Reuters hide caption

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@johnachau via Reuters

Killing Of American Missionary Ignites Debate Over How To Evangelize

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Newlyweds Saumil and Zarina Shah stayed at a safe house in New Delhi run by the Love Commandos, a group that rescues interfaith and inter-caste couples from potential violence and helps them hide from their families. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

When India's Interfaith Couples Encounter Threats, 'Love Commandos' Come To Their Aid

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At least 36 students at a North Carolina school have become infected with chickenpox. The school has many students whose parents claimed a religious exemption from state vaccination requirements. Milos Bataveljic/Getty Images hide caption

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Milos Bataveljic/Getty Images

A black trash bag covers a red swastika painted over a mural at Duke University. Dedicated to the victims of the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting, the original mural replaced the yellow star in the Pittsburgh Steelers' emblem with the Star of David and read, "We must build this world from love." The Duke Chronicle hide caption

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The Duke Chronicle

Mir, a Pakistani man who used to live in Xinjiang, China, clutches the hands of his two daughters. Since Chinese authorities detained his wife, he's been raising their two girls alone. "My mind just won't work," he says. "I sound incoherent, I can't think, I even forget what to say in my prayers." Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

'My Family Has Been Broken': Pakistanis Fear For Uighur Wives Held In China

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Gert Berliner's Swedish ID card with which he eventually entered the U.S. in 1947. He lived in Berlin until he was 14 years old. Gert escaped the Nazi death camps because his parents got him on a children's transport to Sweden in 1939. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR