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Efforts to rebuild the Victoria Islamic Center started within days of an arson attack in January 2017. The Texas mosque is getting closer to being ready to hold services again. Victoria Islamic Center hide caption

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Victoria Islamic Center

Nuns of the Missionaries of Charity, the order founded by Mother Teresa, walk in annual Corpus Christi procession organized on the Feast of Christ the King in Kolkata, India, in 2016. Bikas Das/AP hide caption

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Bikas Das/AP

A Look At The #MeToo Movement In The Shambhala Buddhist Community

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Evangelical minister Rob Schenck says change is a part of spirituality: "Any time we stop changing, we stagnate spiritually, emotionally [and] intellectually." Courtesy of Purple Mickey Productions LLC/Harper Collins hide caption

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Courtesy of Purple Mickey Productions LLC/Harper Collins

Once Militantly Anti-Abortion, Evangelical Minister Now Lives 'With Regret'

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The 1968 release of The Beatles' Yellow Submarine film influenced fashion, graphic design, music — and even a short-lived organization of "submarine churches" based on the gospel of Lennon and McCartney: "All You Need Is Love." Yellow Submarine Movie/Abramorama hide caption

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Yellow Submarine Movie/Abramorama

A Pakistani Jew Wants To Travel To Israel

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Seventeen-year-old Ahmed Burhan Mohamed has earned the title of hafiz — someone who has not only learned to read the Quran, but memorized it. DIHQA on YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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DIHQA on YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Minnesota Teen Brings Home Top Prize In International Quran Competition

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Rev. Brad Wells, left, Rev. Patrick Mahoney and Paula Oas, kneel in prayer in front of the Supreme Court in December as justices hear arguments in the Masterpiece Cakeshop case. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

One recent study estimated that Americans are spending nearly six hours a day on their connected devices. Add television to that and the total rises to nearly 10 hours. Deborah Lee/NPR hide caption

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Deborah Lee/NPR

Many Look To Buddhism For Sanctuary From An Over-Connected World

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Supreme Court's Religious Makeup Evolves As Members Change

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In Shoko Asahara's eight-year trial, he spoke incoherently and never explained the motive for the attacks or acknowledged responsibility. He is seen here in 1989 in Bonn, Germany. Roberto Pfeil/AP hide caption

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Roberto Pfeil/AP

For A Church Defined By Tradition, Changing Catholic Doctrine Can Present A Problem

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Pope Paul VI acknowledges cheers as standing on platform in Bogota, Colombia, on Aug. 22, 1968. AP hide caption

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AP

50 Years Ago, The Pope Called Birth Control 'Intrinsically Wrong'

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José Rolando Arévalo, a 24-year-old ex-gang member, prays at Eben-ezer church. His head is tattooed with the number 18, a reference to his affiliation with the Barrio 18 gang. Alicia Vera hide caption

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Alicia Vera

For Some Gang Members In El Salvador, The Evangelical Church Offers A Way Out

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In El Salvador, Becoming An Evangelical Is A Way Out Of A Gang

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Nailah Winkfield (left) and Omari Sealey, the mother and uncle of Jahi McMath, listen to doctors speak during a news conference in San Francisco in 2014. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

When the First Congregational Church of Oakland decided to hang a Black Lives Matter sign, they started a conversation that led them to try to stop calling police, especially on people of color. Sandhya Dirks /KQED hide caption

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Sandhya Dirks /KQED

Oakland Church Steps Out On Faith And Pledges To Stop Calling Police

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J.D. Greear The Summit Church hide caption

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The Summit Church

Southern Baptist Head Urges Evangelicals To Avoid Political Ideology Amid Crossroads

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Sahar Pirzada, program and outreach manager for HEART, leads a workshop at Peace Over Violence in downtown Los Angeles. Josie Huang/KPCC hide caption

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Josie Huang/KPCC

Muslim Sex Educators Forge Their Own #MeToo Movement

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