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At their most recent General Convention, the Episcopal church passed resolutions supporting gender-affirming care and developing resources to welcome and support transgender and nonbinary people. Celeste Noche for NPR hide caption

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Celeste Noche for NPR

Trans religious leaders say scripture should inspire inclusive congregations

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Will Sideri bought a 700-year-old manuscript that was used in the Beauvais Cathedral in France for $75 at an estate sale in Waterville, Maine. An expert on manuscripts said the document could be worth as much as $10,000. Will Sideri via AP hide caption

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Will Sideri via AP

Christiane Amanpour, shown in 2018, said her interview with Iran's president was canceled when she refused to wear a headscarf. Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images

This photo taken on June 2, 2019 shows a facility believed to be a re-education camp where mostly Muslim ethnic minorities are detained, in Artux, north of Kashgar in China's western Xinjiang region. GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images

People walk by the campus of Yeshiva University in New York City on Aug. 30. The school told students in an email that it was pausing all student clubs on campus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A new study modeled four scenarios for how religious affiliation could change in the U.S., and it projected that the percentage of people with no religious affiliation will rise. DiggPirate/Getty Images hide caption

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DiggPirate/Getty Images

America's Christian majority is on track to end

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People walk by the campus of Yeshiva University in New York City on Aug. 30. A Supreme Court ruling left in place a New York state court ruling requiring the university to recognize the YU Pride Alliance. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Archie Panjabi at the Emmy Awards in 2010. Panjabi, a non-Muslim actress, played a Muslim character in the 2018 British limited series Next of Kin, a show discussed in a new study from the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative. Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

The tapestry depicting late Pope John Paul I hanging from the facade of St. Peter's Basilica, is unveiled during the beatification ceremony led by Pope Francis at the Vatican, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2022. Andrew Medichini/AP hide caption

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Andrew Medichini/AP

Dan Sideris is reflected in a front storm door Thursday as he and his wife, Carrie Sideris, of Newton, Mass., return to door-to-door visits as Jehovah's Witnesses in Boston. After more than two and a half years on hiatus due to the coronavirus pandemic, members are reviving a religious practice that the faith considers crucial and cherished. Mary Schwalm/AP hide caption

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Mary Schwalm/AP

Regina Campbell holds her paperwork for knocking on doors to tell residents about issues on the ballot in the fall, including a potential constitutional amendment on reproductive rights, in Pontiac, Mich., on August 6, 2022. Sarah Rice/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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Sarah Rice/The Washington Post via Getty Im

The Michigan supreme court set to decide whether voters see abortion on the ballot

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Pastor Michael Jennings of Childersburg, Ala., says he was arrested and charged with a crime while watering his neighbor's flowers. Childersburg Police Department/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Childersburg Police Department/Screenshot by NPR

Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams joins a group of women as they discuss their personal stories of miscarraige at her campaign headquarters in Decatur, Ga. on Aug. 3. Riley Bunch/GPB hide caption

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Riley Bunch/GPB

Stacey Abrams is behind in the polls and looking to abortion rights to help her win

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García greets a woman before Friday prayer. Toya Sarno Jordan hide caption

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Toya Sarno Jordan

'From haram to halal': How a bar became a shelter for Muslim migrants in Mexico

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro receives a blessing during a music festival organized by a local evangelic radio station on July 2, in Rio de Janeiro. Buda Mendes/Getty Images hide caption

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Buda Mendes/Getty Images

Why Brazil's Bolsonaro is courting evangelicals in the world's biggest Catholic nation

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Members of the All India Muslim Students Federation protest at Delhi University against the hijab ban in educational institutions, on Feb. 8 in New Delhi, India. Sanchit Khanna/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Sanchit Khanna/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

As India turns 75, Muslim girls are suing to wear the hijab — and protect secularism

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A cross and Bible sculpture stand outside the Southern Baptist Convention headquarters in Nashville, Tenn., on May 24. The Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention says that several of the denomination's major entities are under investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice. Holly Meyer/AP hide caption

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Holly Meyer/AP

Friends Nasir Dhillon (left) and Papinder Singh run a YouTube channel, Punjabi Lehar, that tries to heal the wounds of Partition through reuniting loved ones separated when British-ruled India was divided into two countries, India and Pakistan, 75 years ago. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

YouTube videos are helping reunite loved ones separated by the India-Pakistan border

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Participants in an interfaith memorial ceremony enter the New Mexico Islamic Center mosque to commemorate four murdered Muslim men, hours after police said they had arrested a prime suspect in the killings, in Albuquerque, N.M., on Tuesday. Andrew Hay/Reuters hide caption

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Andrew Hay/Reuters