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Mohsin Hamid is also the author of three novels, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, The Reluctant Fundamentalist and Moth Smoke. Jillian Edelstein/CAMERA PRESS hide caption

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Jillian Edelstein/CAMERA PRESS

Pakistani Author Mohsin Hamid And His Roving 'Discontent'

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'Father Ted' Remembered As Influential Figure In Catholic Education

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Boys in Uppsala, Sweden, read supportive messages placed at the entrance of a mosque following an attack in January. A new Pew study finds that religious intolerance is a global problem, with Muslims facing more hostility from individuals, and Christians from governments. Targeting of Jews, the study found, has gotten worse over in recent years. Anders Wiklund/AP hide caption

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Anders Wiklund/AP

Pew Study On Religion Finds Increased Harassment Of Jews

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Controversial Austrian Law Encourages Teaching Islam In German

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Samantha Elauf was not hired by the preppy retailer Abercrombie & Fitch because she wore a headscarf during her job interview, which the company said conflicted with its dress code. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Steve Green in the basement of the Washington Design Center, which was recently demolished as part of the construction for the Museum of the Bible. Green and his family, owners of Hobby Lobby, are building the Museum of the Bible. Andre Chung for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Andre Chung for The Washington Post/Getty Images

D.C. Bible Museum Will Be Immersive Experience, Organizers Say

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At Supreme Court, Fashion Collides With Religion In Headscarf Case

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A dozen families gather in Dover, Del., for a house church meeting. Everyone brings something, either a dish for the potluck dinner or a conversation topic for the informal worship service. Eleanor Klibanoff hide caption

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Eleanor Klibanoff

House Churches Swap Steeples For Sofas, And Say They've Never Been Closer

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Mohamed Magid, imam with the All Dulles Area Muslim Society, speaks during in September during an anti-extremism news conference. He says that if someone with dangerous views comes to his mosque, he first tries to correct them, but reports them to authorities if necessary. Michael Reynolds/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/EPA/Landov

More Muslim Groups Voice Willingness To Combat Extremism In Their Faith

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This image provided by the Durham County Sheriff's Office shows a booking photo of Craig Stephen Hicks, 46, who was arrested on three counts of murder early Wednesday. On his Facebook page, Hicks described himself as a gun-toting atheist. Durham County Sheriff's Office/AP hide caption

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Durham County Sheriff's Office/AP

Some See Extreme 'Anti-Theism' As Motive In N.C. Killings

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Taking Stock Of Pope Francis After Two Years On The Job

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