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Chicago Tribune Investigation Reveals Financial Burdens Of Chicago Catholic Churches

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Muslims Are Over-Represented In State Prisons, Report Says

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New Poll Shows Young Americans Are Not Especially Knowledgeable About Religion

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CBD, A Christian Book Company, Changes Name To Avoid Calls About CBD Gummies

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Joshua Harris, one of the most influential voices on sex and relationships for a generation of evangelical Christians, has announced that he and his wife are separating after 20 years of marriage. Katherine Frey/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Katherine Frey/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Evangelical Writer Who Influenced Purity Culture Announces Separation From Wife

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A pro-Trump sign next to B'nai Israel Reform Temple on Long Island, where Rep. Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y., is a member. Charles Lane/WSHU hide caption

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Charles Lane/WSHU

Trump's Attack On 'The Squad' Finds Nuanced Support Among Some Jewish Americans

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House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., joined from left by House Republican Conference chair Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., speaks to reporters prior to a vote called by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., to condemn what she called "racist comments" by President Donald Trump, at the Capitol on July 16, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Opinion: Should Republicans Still Call Themselves The Party Of Lincoln?

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Church And Clergy Have Fallen Out Of Favor, New Polls Show

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State Department Conference Aims To Identify Victims Of Religious Persecution

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Democrats are hopeful they can mobilize a religious left to counter the religious right. But it's unclear whether that outreach will resonate with voters who make up the religious middle. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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A-Digit/Getty Images

Democrats Have The Religious Left. Can They Win The Religious Middle?

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Visiting A Historic Mosque In North Dakota

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Andrea and Leslie Isham got married last year during a drag show at a night club in Tennessee by a friend who was ordained online. A new law in the state seeks to ban online ordinations. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán/WPLN News hide caption

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Sergio Martínez-Beltrán/WPLN News

Tennessee Lawmakers Aim To Ban Weddings By Internet-Ordained Ministers

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